My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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NEW YORK—We drove into Albany this morning a little after eight o'clock, giving a last affectionate look at the creation of our hands, and feeling that sense of satisfaction that everybody has, who has done something entirely different from what they do as an everyday occupation and found that they could do it moderately well.

We reached Poughkeepsie and my son, John, met us in his roadster. So many and varied were our bags that I wondered how we would ever get them into his rumble seat. He drove us to the cottage, we met my granddaughter, Sistie, on John's hunter looking like a peanut on such a big horse. With her was one of the grooms and unfortunately, our setter dog, Jack. We speeded ahead to shut up the police dog. Sistie was serenely confidant that because the dog had been shut up the day before, he would be today! However, he was out and for one terrible moment I thought we would have a tremendous dog fight, but instead there were snarls and much noise and then John shoved Jack into his car where he lay peacefully and repentent while the police dog disappeared entirely.

After all this excitement John changed places with the groom and rode off with Sistie, leaving the groom to drive his car back so he could take us to the station.

After this, Mrs. Scheider and I were confronted with two desks simply covered with mail. We did our best to pick out the really urgent letters and made a large package of the balance to take back to Washington.

Sistie and Buzzie came over for a brief visit, but this time without any dogs! At twelve-thirty John was back. We left two bags but we had accumulated two bundles so the rumble seat was as full as ever. If John had grown up a generation earlier so he could remember what some of the bundles at Ellis Island looked like, he probably would have told us we were a good copy of an immigrant family on the move.

Of course, he remembered after he came for us that he had forgotten some mail which he wanted Mrs. Scheider to take care of for him, and as he had plenty of time we stopped at the big house and made our train comfortably.

On the train Mrs. Scheider and I went into the buffet car for some thing to eat and found ourselves very close to a table full of Landon-button-wearing men, very prosperous looking business men. If I had been sure of their sense of humor I should have passed them a little pamphlet got out by the Business Men's League for Roosevelt which tells of all the good things that have happened to business since March, 1933. I was afraid they might not see it my way, and so I restrained this mad impulse!

After an hour at Democratic headquarters and a little shopping and a stop at my apartment, I will be on my way to Washington.

E.R.
TMsd 14 September 1936, AERP, FDRL