My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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NEW YORK—After my picnickers left me yesterday I was just going to quietly dress and go to New York, when a car drove up and in it were my aunt and uncle, Mr. and Mrs. David Gray. They had just come up from Florida and were on their way to our old home at Tivoli, which now belongs to Mrs. Gray. It was a joy to see them, and we talked of this and that until I realized if I did not file my column some one would be calling me on the telephone to reprimand me for tardiness and they woke up to the fact that they must drive on some twenty-five miles up the River to get home before dark.

So we got into our respective cars and went in opposite directions, I to the telegraph office and then back to the house, a hurried change into city clothes, a goodbye to my grandchildren and my mother-in-law and off to the station. Ten o'clock found me at my apartment in New York City.

Miss Lape joined me this morning at eight-fifteen for our coffee on the porch, and just as I was sallying forth very hurriedly a voice said to me: "Mrs. Roosevelt, couldn't I give you a lift?" And the gentleman who lives in an apartment on the first floor was standing by his car at our door. Very gratefully I got in, and was whizzed up to my daughter's apartment, to pick up a member of my family and take him to the executioner, so to speak, for he has to have four wisdom teeth extracted in the course of the next few days. She and I had great difficulty prodding our unwilling victim into hurrying to our unpleasant appointment, but we arrived on time! The dentist, Dr. Wilbur Dailey, exclaimed over this unusual occurance and the victim said ruefully: "Mother brought me!"

I am always an optimist and hope that things will go smoothly and as a matter of fact they did and two wisdom teeth were extracted today. But it took until twelve o'clock and then we had to go back to the house and start in on half hourly treatments which must continue for the rest of the day. By the time every one was instructed and a little diagram of what should be done was made out, I was late for a twelve-thirty appointment with Mrs. Henry Morgenthau, Junior. However, we got together for a little while and then after a little shopping I went in to headquarters where I had several appointments.

One of these was interesting to me for so few people in this world put themselves out to do something themselves for another human being. They will write a letter or draw a check, they will go and see someone if it is convenient, but to take a long train journey of over twelve hours to come and tell me the story of a friend in order that I may be sufficiently interested to help that friend is giving of oneself in a rare way. So one of my visitors left me with renewed respect for those people who will take the trouble to do something for a friend at the cost of personal inconvenience. Now I must go back to my daughter's apartment for the rest of the day and evening.

E.R.
TMsd 1 September 1936, AERP, FDRL