My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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HYDE PARK—Mrs. Morgenthau and I left in my car at a quarter before on this morning to go to Woodstock, New York, an artists' colony back of Kingston, to see the sketches for the murals which Mr. Chas. Rosen is doing for the post office at Beacon, New York.

Any one who knows Woodstock, will agree I think, that it is a charming place and it shows what good taste and imagination can do to create a delightful atmosphere.

In the first place, there are a number of attractive spots where you may stop and eat out of doors if you wish. Unfortunately I did not have a chance to stop, so I can say nothing about the food, but I know if I could eat on a little terrace back of an old stone house which we saw, I would be satisfied with very simple fare!

I have always loved the Catskill Mountains and they loom up very close and in every direction there seemed to be attractive spots to paint. We saw one or two easels set up and painters so engrossed that they did not even look at passing cars. We found our artist's house quite easily and spent a delightful time in his studio. The map which is to go the length of the lobby in the post office is not only lovely in color but interesting in design, and the other paintings harmonize in color and give additional views which are interesting historically as well as scenically. From here we motored down on Route 9 W, to Milton, which is just below the Mid-Hudson Bridge. We lunched with Mrs. Edward Young, who has been for a long time a great influence in farm life in New York State. She had asked us to come and talk over certain matters of interest to farm women. I feel it is very important to knit more closely together our own farm women in various parts of the country. We are such a large country that it is sometimes hard for us to realize that we are one nation, and that the interests of one part of the country, though they may be at variance with other parts, must react on each other and are therefore of interest to all men and women everywhere in the United States.

By three-fifteen we were back at the cottage where I found some mail awaiting me, but this is my day for gadding, and in a little while Mrs. Scheider and I are going to cross the river again, and go for tea with Mr. Henry Junge who lives at Middle Hope, New York, and with whom in winter we have frequent contacts as we arrange all the entertainments for the White House.

E.R.
TMsd 13 August 1936, AERP, FDRL