My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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POUGHKEEPSIE, N.Y.—We had a funny evening yesterday. Four of our guests were arriving by motor and my daughter and her husband were leaving by motor for New York in the early evening. For their convenience, we had supper at 6:45 but when that hour arrived, our incoming guests were not there and we were just getting up from the table as they drove up to the door. So they had supper all by themselves at what we call "the children's table" in the alcove off the dining room. By ten minutes before eleven, the President and his party started for the train. Franklin, Jr. and John, who had been out with their father all the afternoon planning the work in the woods which he wants to have done while he is gone, were so weary that they went to bed early. Even I, who am as a rule quite a night-owl, was glad when everybody was safely started on their journey though I wished that they did not have to go back to Washington at this season. My husband feels, however, that certain things can only be done at his desk in Washington and regardless of how much the house is torn up, he must go there now and then. This morning, the boys and I breakfasted at 7:30 and I drove out to the woods with them to see where they were laying out the new road and preparing to cut trees. Afterwards, Miss Josephine Roche, who came up yesterday afternoon to spend the night, drove about with me and told me some of the interesting developments in coordination between various bureaus that she is interested in. She left by train for New York and then our other guests continued on their way to Maine. At 10:30, I started alone in my car to go to my friend, Mrs. Sherwood, in Cornwall, New York. Just before reaching her house, I took the wrong turn and stopped to ask a couple of children where Mrs. Sherwood lived. To my amusement, they chorused, "You mean Dr. Sherwood?" For fifty years perhaps, Mrs. Sherwood has lived in Cornwall and worked at everything of a civic and philanthropic nature but she now has a grown daughter who is an orthopedic surgeon with an office in Newburgh, New York and she was the one the children knew. Mrs. Sherwood and I can both feel sure that there will be plenty of young ones in our families to pick up any work that we may wish to drop, which is a comforting thought. After lunch, Dr. Williams, the new superintendent at the New York State Training School for Boys in Warwick, came to get us and I had a most interesting visit at the School, seeing great changes in the grounds and improvements everywhere. The boys are particularly proud of their new suits and all looked very nice. I must start now for home if I am to be there in time for dinner with my boys.

E.R.
TMsd 10 August 1936, AERP, FDRL