My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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HYDE PARK, N.Y.—This day began early in the morning! Mrs. Woodward was to make a seven-forty train and I had arranged for her to pick up Miss Cook and Dr. Elizabeth Howe, for they all wanted to be in New York early. The only one who has been off on a real holiday was Miss Cook and though she did not murmur, I was saying for her: "How disagreeable it is to have to leave the country on a hot day and go in and work in the city!"

At midnight last night Miss Dickerman and Mrs. O'Day started for the western part of the state. Mrs. O'Day remarked that she could hardly see any point in going to bed as they got on the train so late and had to get off so early! From past experience I well know that getting in late and starting early is one of the symptoms of being in a political campaign, and wickedly I gloat a little that I don't have to do it! Instead I saw them all off in my riding clothes this morning, had my breakfast and rode for an hour.

Then Mrs. Scheider and I worked until about twelve o'clock when I had a swim before lunch. We met a friend at the station at one-forty-five, did a little shopping and returning to the cottage I promptly deserted them. My husband was holding a conference and these hot days I find someone who can serve tea at intervals during the afternoons is rather welcome.

The President brought me from two officials of the Canadian government beautiful samples of Canadian handcraft. One a lovely woven blanket and the other a hooked rug with a picture of a farm house and a horse and wagon, really beautifully done. When I was in St. Andrews the other day the woman who runs the Cottage Industries up there, told me she wished we might have no tariffs on hand work so that we could exchange our wares. I was rather surprised for I felt the competition might be keen, but she pointed out that there is individuality about all hand work and that homespuns, knitted or hooked rugs are different in Canada than in our mountain states and in all other countries, and that a wider market would be beneficial.

The President has just taken some friends to drive around the place to see how much damage the windstorm of two weeks ago has done in the woods and they will join us shortly at the cottage for tea.

E.R.
TMsd 3 August 1936, AERP, FDRL