My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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CAMPOBELLO, N.B.—After rain and fog on Friday, Saturday morning still looked pretty hopeless but by ten o'clock they assured us that all the weather reports said northwest wind and that means good weather for us. All of us, Mr. and Mrs. Harry Hopkins, Captain Eugene Harrison, Miss Dickerman, Miss Cook, Mrs. Scheider and I got on our Captain's boat and headed up the St. Croix River to St. Andrews. This is a boat Captain Calder uses in winter for fishing but it is comfortable and roomy, and though the engine is at times a little temperamental, dying out for no apparent reason and starting up again in much the same way, we never fail to reach our destination in time. No man on the Island knows the waters around here better than Captain Calder and after all it is good for us to learn not to be on any scheduled hours!

By twelve o'clock we reached St. Andrews which is the terminus for the Canadian Pacific Railroad. Those who had never seen the picturesque village wandered around while I went at once to do some necessary shopping for the house.

The Charlotte County Industries are always tempting to visit for they have delightful homespuns, handwoven blankets and knitted goods of all kinds. By a little after one we were started on our way up the St. Croix River to St. Stephens as I had to get more sheets for the cottage. This is a very pretty part of the River. A bridge crosses here to the United States. The only other possible crossing is just above St. Andrews where a little ferry crosses to the Maine side of the River.

We did not tarry long in St. Stephens. The passengers in one car waved at me and when I stopped to speak to them I found that I had met the gentleman in Detroit. They have a summer place nearby.

The sky was blue and the sun shone from about eleven o'clock but as we came across from Eastport the sun was going down and windows of the houses looked as though a fire was burning inside. We landed about seven with ravenous appetites and could hardly stay awake after dinner long enough to play a game!

Today is clear and sunny and my husband must be having a fine sail across the Bay of Fundy to Grand Manan. I am going down in a few minutes to the little Anglican church on the Island which we always attend and which was built by the original settler, Admiral Owen who was granted the Island by the Crown and brought over the original colonizers.

E.R.
TMsd 26 July 1936, AERP, FDRL