My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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NEW YORK—My sister-in-law, Mrs. J. R. Roosevelt and I had a very pleasant time with the young Democrats last night. Those of us who are somewhat older Democrats were kept in countenance by the fact that the Mayor and his wife, and a number of other prominent Democrats from different parts of the county were present.

I was very much interested in the young President of the new organization, Mr. Riorden, who seemed keen to make it a success and the officers all seemed equally interested. In fact that young lass who met me seemed very responsive and competent besides looking very charming and giving me a feeling that she would be much sought after at any party. The orchestra was composed entirely of the members of one family and I was told that they donated their services for the evening. If this spirit dominates the organization, I think they will become a strong influence in the political life of the county. The county chairman remarked that politics in all parties have been too much dominated by a spirit of: "What can I get from my Party," instead of: "What can I do for my Party." Of course, this attitude in political parties is the same which we have in business and in our general philosophy of life, so if we succeed in changing it as a basic philosophy we will probably soon find it disappearing from our political party organizations.

My husband having successfully departed last evening, Miss LeHand left with her aunt for a holiday this morning at seven fifteen. At eleven thirty the representatives of the various Secretaries of State from the different States in the Union who began their meeting in Albany yesterday, appeared at the Big House. Both my mother-in-law and my husband being away, I had to attempt to tell them something about the points of interest, but I am not as good a guide as either of them. Their visit was short as they had to continue to West Point. After they left I drove over to the cottage for a quick luncheon, and then Mrs. Scheider and I went to New York by the 1 o'clock train.

Last night was the first cool night in some time, and I revelled in the fact that a breeze blowing from the south made my room very comfortable. Even the dogs ceased to pant for a little while.

E.R.
TMsd 14 July 1936, AERP, FDRL