My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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HYDE PARK—I left for Hyde Park yesterday afternoon at six o'clock as I intended to do, but I think I must record my admiration for the devotion of these summer school students. The Hall was packed for the opening of this course, and as you know yesterday was warm! I could not help sympathizing with everybody present.

The drive up cooled us off but when we arrived we had to go indoors to eat our supper and it was almost like stepping into a furnace. I always have felt that the Hudson River is a warm spot when it is warm anywhere but my husband called late in the evening and I rather hesitatingly inquired how they were surviving in Washington. He said cheerily: "The heat is fearful and I am so busy all I hope is to live until I get on the train and start off on my trip!"

Four of us got up at five this morning to take a long motor drive before the traffic on the road was heavy, and were back by ten-fifteen. Since then the telephone and the mail and the various plans for arrivals and departures tomorrow have kept me very busy.

Never think that you are going to have an uneventful day as long as you have a large family and are part of the entourage of a man in public office! Something new always turns up at the last minute, often it is something very pleasant, but still it is unexpected!

All the press were much excited yesterday because one of the books published for older boys by the Junior Literary Guild criticizes in one of its chapters a policy of the present Administration. Because I happen to be on the editorial board they saw an exciting story in the making! I explained, however, that none of us on the editorial board ever know what the final decisions are. We read the books that are sent us to read and make our comments and give our reasons for those comments without the assistance of anyone else on the board. We do not know whether our opinion will be the majority opinion or not, and this is as it should be.

A book should be judged as a whole and not for one chapter or one opinion.

E.R.
TMsd 10 July 1936, AERP, FDRL