My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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NEW YORK—It was glorious yesterday afternoon after all the heat of the day to arrive at the cottage at Hyde Park, put on a bathing suit and stay in the pool off and on for an hour! I tried to play one of those childish games of throwing rope circles over some pegs and was as awkward as possible. Irritated beyond words with myself and growing hotter even than I had been when going around the camps. It was a comfort at least to be able to plunge into the pool!

We had dinner on the porch with the sun setting across the brook and over the faraway hills. Even at Hyde Park we need rain very badly which keeps one reminded of the suffering in the middle west. It seems as though the people living in states that have been visited by recurring droughts were getting more than their share of hardship. They are suffering of course because as a nation we haven't expected our government to show foresight in the development of the land. We have allowed individuals to do as they thought best and they could hardly be expected to have an altruistic attitude on the future. Now we are faced with lands that must be returned to buffalo grass or trees in order to prevent the suffering which many of our people are enduring today. All of us will gladly help in the emergency but I hope we will do more than that, and set ourselves to studying the things which have caused these conditions and never rest until our government remedies them.

We came down to New York by a morning train after breakfast on the porch and since then I have had a long conference with a gentleman who is deeply interested in certain specific methods of meeting the general economic problems. I have talked over some educational ideas with two men who visited Arthurdale and are deeply interested in what is being done in the rehabilitation of a community through the influence of the school.

A short visit with Mrs. Ruth Bryan Owen whom I am happy to see so radiant.

At five I go to a tea at Teachers College and speak at five-thirty on "The President Day Agencies Directed Toward the Security of the American Home and Family." This is such a mammoth subject that I have asked to be allowed to limit it somewhat, otherwise I feel both the speaker and the audience might spend the night at Columbia, and I expect to be in a motor starting for Hyde Park at 6.

E.R.
TMsd 9 July 1936, AERP, FDRL