My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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POUGHKEEPSIE, N.Y.—I arrived last night at a quarter before one, driving in from the airport. My only other fellow passenger was a very nice young man who confided to me that he had learned to fly because he had so many automobile accidents that he thought on the whole that it was safer to fly. I had no idea what his name was, but he told me he was in the same business as our eldest son, and he knew that our second son had been interested in aviation, so we had plenty to talk about. When we got out he introduced himself and I felt I had made a very pleasant new acquaintance.

Mrs. Scheider and I had an early breakfast on the balcony and gathering up our bags, arrived at my daughter's apartment at nine a.m. The National Youth Administrator for New York City, Mr. McCloskey, joined us there. By nine-twenty we were on our way to Camp Jane Addams and arrived there simultaneously with the press and the photographers. It was interesting to me to be back in this old camp which is being reorganized and is now giving considerably more education. A few changes have been made in the actual camp itself and the routine is much as it always was. I think the Youth Administration is using better judgment in its choice of girls, so there were more girls than there used to be under the old FERA management, in camp.

As we drove away my daughter said something to me which is very true, that to most of these young people whose sorrows and difficulties seem to arise out of the lack of money, the possession of money is the answer to every problem. One of the things I think we need to emphasize to all young people, whether rich or poor, is the fact that while everyone needs to be able to provide themselves with a decent standard of living, lacking certain other qualifications in themselves, the money which makes such a standard possible will not give them a happy life.

We visited the Hudson Guild Camp, Felicia, where young girls and boys are taken for the summer. I am now on my way to Hyde Park. Only someone with great determination and belief is their mission could have moved me today to do anything! So it was a tribute to her conviction that I finally agreed to present her ideas to Dr. John Studebaker, Commissioner of Education in the Department of the Interior.

It is cooler today but not too cool that you embrace new ideas with energy!

E.R.
TMsd 8 July 1936, AERP, FDRL