My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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HYDE PARK—Such a bevy of ladies as came up here yesterday to recuperate from the Convention! Miss Mary Dewson; Mrs. William H. Good; Mr. and Mrs. Henry Goddard Leach; Colonel and Mrs. Frederick Greene from Albany; Mrs. Daniel O'Day and her daughter Elia; Mrs. George Backer; Mrs. Charles W. Tillett, Jr., of North Carolina; Miss Fannie Hurst and last but not least, Miss Frances Perkins who was too exhausted to get up early enough in the morning to arrive for lunch, but who arrived in the afternoon in time to spend an hour with us all. Miss Cook was their hostess at the Val-Kill Cottage. They lay around the lawn and some of them went in swimming, they all came over in a body to see the President. The rest of the time they ate and slept and talked.

By seven o'clock everyone had gone home and my children were so weary they began to insist on going to bed by nine fifteen. Even the President went to bed at ten-thirty!

Anna and I drove her husband and James and Betsey to the train at a quarter before eight this morning and came back and went out riding immediately. It was a grand time to ride and a lovely cool day but we talked so hard that we rode rather leisurely and came back reluctantly at nine forty five to turn our horses over to the children.

Then I went to the Cottage to put some rooms in order which we are using for guests this summer and later we drove up with a friend to see an old house which he has bought and is doing over.

Governor Horner and Commissioner Murphy of the Philippines, together with two or three cousins, were at luncheon when I got home. "Late as usual," was the chorus which greeted me. This afternoon my husband drove some of us including the two grandchildren, over some newly finished roads, telling John how he wished some of them changed and where the new ones would be put through. These are dirt roads for riding and to get into the woods but not very good for motors but the President considers any thing possible for his Ford. I have tramped these woods for many years and it is a continuous surprise to me when we build a new road how different they look!

My husband leaves again tonight for Washington and I know he is regretful at having to leave this peaceful spot. John and I are glad that we can stay on.

E.R.
TMsd 29 June 1936, AERP, FDRL