My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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SEQUIN, TEXAS, Thursday—One would think that parading around cities would eventually become somewhat monotonous because when the streets are lined with people, and flags are flying, you are really not able to see any of the individual characteristics that do distinguish one city from another. In spite of all my experience, however, there are certain incidents which make watching crowds interesting. For instance in Houston this morning a group of colored girls in bright colored dresses, holding the top of a large cardboard box over their combined heads to shelter them from the sun and waving madly at the President, even jumping up and down which made their shelter a trifle uneven and uncertain; a little group of crippled children brought out in their wheel chairs and even on cots to the edge of the road and all the people around so careful not to close in in front of them in order that they might get a glimpse of the President as he went by. Of course, he had his car drive close to them very slowly so that he might say a special word of greeting to them. Children nearly always catch my eye, and I know them in every mood. If they stand for hours in the broiling sun as most of the people did today little children will be tired and sleepy and cling like little limpets to their fathers' neck, or some bright little boy who has evidently been told to look for the President, has his eyes glued on the motorcycle escort in front, and is evidently annoyed with his parents who are trying to make him turn his head to look at the less interesting car in which drives the President of the United States.

I found it warm today and marvelled at the people who had stood for hours in the streets in such orderly fashion having enough energy left to cheer the President as he went by. It is interesting too, to note than in these Democratic States there is a sense of well-being and friendliness which is constantly mentioned by the political leaders. My mind runs back though to the many people who are not lined up in the streets and who are still without work or struggling on a farm for inadequate wages. We are on the move and things are better but we have not yet arrived and we must not lull ourselves to sleep with a false sense of achievement.

News has come of Governor Landon's nomination—not a great surprise to us who have listened to Senator Steiwer and Ex-President Hoover. The platform which will be drafted by the Convention is of paramount interest. For once the Republican Party seems to be made up of as many varying elements as the Democratic has often been!

Senator and Mrs. Sheppard, and Governor and Mrs. Allred lunched with us and we have been looking out at the wonderful natural prairie land with here and there a wide irrigation canal. This is good grazing country and what a tremendous state!

E.R.
TMsd 11 June 1936, AERP, FDRL