My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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WASHINGTON— The WPA women administrators who are meeting here put on an exhibition of work done in the different states and I was interested to see really lovely cooper bowls and pitchers made from copper mined at Ajo, Arizona, which is near Congresswoman Greenway's home.

There were woven things and innumerable garments for young and old made in the sewing rooms, and one thing which interested me greatly was a collection of dolls dressed to represent different periods in our history. They will be valuable historically in almost any museum. The Braille project with the first historical map ever made for the blind; the health project showing the different things that have been done in different states to increase the health of the community. Think of a state that had not a single county nurse in the rural areas! The best part of it is that much of this work which has been started to relieve unemployment is being taken over on a permanent basis by state and local governments.

I get a thrill of pride in what the women have done in this whole situation and when I hear the story told of an unassuming, quiet local director in one of the flood areas, who commandeered a truck and moved her supplies to the place where they were needed most, establishing a base and working for five days with no real place to sleep, I decided that after all the pioneer spirit isn't dead. If we can meet emergencies so well, surely we can solve our long time problem also!

I worked all last evening and saw our son, John, off on the midnight to New York where he breakfasted with his sister before going back to college.

My husband's mother is on her way home from Texas and I can hardly wait to hear her account of the trip. She insists that it was an easy trip and wonders why any one suggested that she should not undertake it.

My press conference this morning was short for I am making so many speeches there is nothing to talk about.

I lunched with Mr. Clarence Phelps Dodge and his committee to talk about the work which they hope to start in organizing a national movement for coordinating all the agencies in an effort to prevent juvenile crime.

At two o'clock I went to the Women's Trade Union League meeting and at four received the District of Columbia Federation of Music Clubs and the members of the Washington Music Teachers Association.

At five we had tea for Madame Vargas; Mademoiselle Vargas; the Brazilian Ambassador and his daughter, Mademoiselle Zazi and Mademoiselle Lais Aranha, his sister; Mrs. Rickard Sandler, wife of the Minister of Foreign Affairs of Sweden and the Swedish Minister and Mrs. Bostrom.

Some friends for dinner and a party at the National Women's Democrat Club for the ladies of the press.

E.R.
TMsd 5 May 1936, AERP, FDRL