My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

Text Size: Small Text Normal Text Large Text Larger Text

NEW YORK—I started Saturday fairly early with a ride at eight-thirty which was much better for the dogs and horses who were beginning to find the middle of the day too warm for exertion!

I was home and dressed and at the Earle Theatre at twenty minutes before eleven to say a word to the packed theatre of crippled children who were enjoying Major Bowes' artists. The faces before me were all enthusiastic and alive and happy, and I hope they carried the happiness back into what must of necessity, be rather restricted lives.

From there I went to the Girl Scout Practice House for my annual visit and it was very interesting for they were holding their tests. In the first room we visited, were two young girls bathing the fattest, jolliest ten months old baby I have ever seen, and she actually bore with the photographers' flashlights without wailing which is a triumph of good temper!

In the next room, a real little girl lay in bed and another one was making up the bed with the "patient" in it. Beyond there girls were sewing and there was quite an exhibition of garments they had made. Downstairs a group was setting a table with a really nice arrangement of flowers as a centerpiece. In the kitchen they were actually turning out of the pans some rolls which were given me in a basket to carry home. A little girl of fourteen put over them a cloth marked with my initials and "G.S." in all the corners, embroirdered as nicely as any one could wish. I went into the garden for a moment where they were taking their geology test, and then they served us with orangeade and Girl Scout cookies.

I left them with a real sense of satisfaction in their achievements.

The President got off at noon with Colonel and Mrs. Murray and one or two others for a night on the Potomac River.

Mrs. Percy Pennybacker who is one of the guests I always love to see arrive, and grieve to see depart, left for Pittsburgh at one forty.

At three o'clock nearly one thousand young people who are graduating this year from the various schools in and around Washington were received. I always enjoy watching these young things go past, wondering what they will do with their lives and how fortune will treat them.

Two or three visitors for tea, a speech for the International Students Club in the evening and our son, John, flying down from Cambridge to try out some horses on Sunday! At least I met him and dined with him but I had to leave him at midnight to spend today with my daughter in New York, as it is her birthday. We picnicked with the children near the City and I am taking the midnight back to Washington so as to be there early Monday morning.

E.R.
TMsd 3 May 1936, AERP, FDRL