My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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WASHINGTON—The weather is almost like summer here today, and I should have liked to get up early and ride for it is really beginning to be too warm to ride in the middle of the morning, but a group from Mr. Tugwell's Planning Division came over last evening to show the President and all of us their work. Charts and models refurnished the long, upstairs corridor of the White House. It was eleven-thirty before they went home and a tremendous basket of mail still awaited my attention, so early rising seemed out of the question this morning. Instead, Colonel and Mrs. Frederick Stuart Greene and I had a leisurely breakfast at eight-thirty. Colonel Greene says that he has ceased to get excited about anything in the world except owning a horse that is actually winning Steeplechase races. His son schooled this horse and is now riding it. He has two victories, one in Richmond and one at Middleburg, Virginia, to his credit this year. Mrs. Greene and I looked at each other with mutual understanding, for I do not think mothers are very fond of seeing their sons ride in Steeplechases even though they realize they can not prevent it!

At nine-thirty four small children came over with a lovely May Day basket. I went out into the garden to receive it. One chubby little boy standing next to me, bore with the photographers for quite a time and then in a most grown up manner said: "I am embarrassed." I gasped and said: "Where did you learn that word?" To which he responded quite solemnly: "I have known it for a long time!"

The last get-together luncheon of the Cabinet ladies took place today and it was warm enough to have it in the garden. We decided to have a picnic for the Senate Ladies as we did last year, so that will give us one more opportunity of seeing them as well as being together ourselves.

This afternoon the members of the American Council on Education, five hundred and fifty strong, are here for tea. The President has to receive two new foreign Ministers in the Blue Room, so there was a little confusion this morning as to whether my tea party or his foreign Ministers were going to have precedence. It was finally decided he should receive his guests at four-thirty and four-forty-five and then the Educational Council would hold full sway!

E.R.
TMsd 1 May 1936, AERP, FDRL