My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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Last night I dined with the District of Columbia Library Association and as I looked at the members I could not help but wish that more people could realize the unselfish services that the librarians, throughout the country, have performed during the past few years. In the face of salary cuts and decreased appropriations for books, they have carried on and made their libraries a refuge and center for many people who sorely needed friendly contacts. I am more and more impressed as I grow older by the unsung heroes of the world, and wish that some one would write an epic about those who carry the brunt of the world's work on their shoulders, receiving little attention in return.

I saw one item in the morning paper which filled me with joy. A Congressional Committee is solemnly deciding apparently that the government shall lead the way in a milk drinking campaign by feeding to soldiers, sailors and CCC boys more milk and milk products. I think this is a grand idea and the numbers involved should be sufficient to even prove the value of these products from the point of view of a scientific experiment. I can think of more groups that should be added if we could only gain their cooperation! All the patriotic societies and legions of past, present and future wars should join in and do this on a grand scale! Quite seriously it's a good plan and I hope it gets carried through.

This has been one of those days when things to do step so swiftly on each other's heels that you are doubtful about getting through the day! We got in a swim this morning as riding was out of the question because of rain; a press conference; a few minutes chat with some girls who had been shown the White House and whom I had promised to see; the usual round of morning tasks which includes the absolutely necessary mail and it was one o'clock. I had a small luncheon in honor of the wife of the President of Brazil who is staying in Washington at the present time. She is most anxious to see what we are doing for children in this country, and will, I hope visit the Bureau of Home Economics and the Children's Bureau while here, and perhaps in New York, some of the hospitals, day nurseries and settlement houses.

The afternoon is one succession of appointments, ending up with several guests for tea, among them Mr. Sherwood Eddy and Mr. Silas Bryan. That is one interesting thing about the White House—you get in a single day little glimpses of many far flung parts of the country.

E.R.
TMsd 2 April 1936, AERP, FDRL