My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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NEW YORK, March 30—Though my grandchildren and I had an uneventful trip to Washington, it made me realize how important it is for children to be brought up by the young.

We played Parcheesi, I read aloud and calculated the minutes it took from New York to Washington. In the middle of the afternoon we drank orangeade and waited for the ice in it to melt—that made us feel we had squeezed out just a little more as we drank it.

The children were as good as gold, but finally when they started in to draw pictures, I found myself placidly going to sleep feeling that I had done a good days work. They got off the train and skipped so fast I almost ran down the platform in my effort to keep up with them.

Sir Thomas and Lady Hohler, who are staying at the White House, went with me to the Hasty Pudding Show last night. It is a fine show, the music and songs are good and the lines really amusing. Sir Thomas remarked he had never seen chorus girls with such muscular legs, but at that, some of them were really pretty.

My son, John, is in the chorus, and I had to ask him the name of the boy who was his "girl", as I could not recognize these transformed beings who really looked very attractive.

We were all invited to go to a cabaret after the show, but I decided my day had been long enough, as did Sir Thomas and his wife who had spent two nights on the train coming up from Mexico. So, we were all glad to go home and sleep in comfortable beds.

I came back to New York this morning, marked mail most of the way and read a book for the Junior Literary Guild.

Mrs. Scheider, Miss Cook, my daughter and I had lunch together at the office on our desks, then I saw a friend of mine from Buffalo, Miss Dorothy Hill, for a few minutes. Now I am off to see some other members of my family.

E.R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL