My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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WASHINGTON, Wednesday—Last night's meeting of the National Library for the Blind was quite an inspiring occasion. Miss Helen Keller's efforts for those who are similarly affected and her willingness to give of herself was a very touching sight.

She spoke of the few books that were available in Braille when she was in college and what it would mean for the blind to have the constantly expanding field of a library of such books.

The National Library for the Blind is a nationwide organization and I hope that it will enlist the interests of the people throughout the country. As I sat on the platform and looked at the people who in spite of their handicap are doing so much, I could not help but to think of what an obligation their example puts on the rest of us.

I rode along the river path this morning, and there are spots in which the horse and dogs sank at least a foot in the mud. When the elements—fire, water and wind—become uncontrollable they bring such destruction in their wake and make human beings so powerless. Yet we keep on working and trying to devise means by which we can protect ourselves. There is something very grand in our courage.

In this morning's paper I noticed that Mr. Morris Llewllyn Cooke thinks we should change our tactics and stop building high dams in favor of lower ones. Nevertheless, the city of Portsmouth, Ohio, seems rather well content with the wall which protected it successfully during the last few days. However, if Mr. Cooke is right I am sure we will be trying his method before long.

I think Dr. Morgan, head of the Tennessee Valley Authority, must be congratulating himself on his plan for flood control that has worked so well around Dayton, Ohio.

Mrs. Lyman Munson from Albany brought her three children in to see the White House this morning and stayed on herself for a ladies' luncheon, at which many attended. Mme. Saito of Japan sat on my right, Mrs. MacWhite from Ireland sat on my left, while Mrs. Byrns, the wife of the Speaker of the House, acted as my co-hostess across the table.

PNews, NYWT, 26 March 1936