My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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WASHINGTON, March 24—Mr. and Mrs. Howard Marsh and their daughter saw me off at the airport in Jacksonville, Fla. last night. The trip up was as smooth and as uneventful as possible.

I was the only woman on the plane so evidently ladies do not like to reach their destination at 4 or 5 a.m. However, I slept most of the way, and though it was a little trying to land at Baltimore and take an hour's drive before I could fall into bed, I did fall in around 5:30 and slept peacefully until 8:30.

It is a gray day and I have spent it indoors catching up on mail and continuing to read the the seemingly never ending number of pamphlets and magazines that find their way to my desk.

One of the members of the pilots association in Jacksonville presented me with a little model of an airplane which I left to be sent on for fear of breaking it on the way. It is a perfect model. Made, I was told, in two days, which shows considerable skill.

I was also very much interested in two samples of hand weaving, a white bag and a gaily colored bag made by the WPA handicraft project in Miami. The weaving is excellent and the finishing of the bag is nicely done. They certainly are very salable and I hope will prove a future method of assistance to people in earning a way to independence.

Among the things I found on my desk today was a report of the New Mexico malaria control project, which is under direction of the State Board of Public Health, and carried out in cooperation with the WPA and the United States Public Health Service. Malaria in New Mexico is not fatal but saps the resistance of its victims and makes them less able to meet their daily tasks successfully.

The project, it seems to me, is not only meeting with great success from the point of view of controlling the disease, but is doing a great deal to give employment as a by-product in reclaiming land, improving highways, conserving water, not to speak of the educational value it gives to the people employed on it.

My thrifty spirit makes me grateful that what we spend today is not pure waste and destruction as it was during the World War.

E.R.
PNews, EPHP, 25 March 1936