My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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I had a letter yesterday telling me that I had neglected to say a word of encouragement to the garden clubs which work so hard in every state and have such a variety of programs that it is difficult to pick out any one achievement! This is perhaps the time of year when the work of encouragement is most timely, for almost everywhere flower lovers are getting out their seed catalogues and preparing for spring planting, so I do it with alacrity!

I think some of the things which I have enjoyed most have nothing to do with formal or informal individual gardens, but I remember still some perfectly beautiful, climbing roses near a railroad station and when I asked if the railroad was responsible I was told: "Yes, but it was the garden club that started the work." All the work done along highways which gives pleasure to the passer-by, as well as to those who do it, has meant a great deal in increasing the realization that our roads are not just cement strips leading as straight as possible from one point to another, but that the scenery and landscaping is part of the road and makes it pleasant or unpleasant travelling.

Our son, Franklin, Junior, came in from college this morning for just a few hours. We had a grand ride.

At luncheon Mr. Anning Prall, Chairman of the Federal Communications Commission was kind enough to give some time out [of his busy day to discuss some radio questions with a young man] who is working with a country school. He told us much about costs of programs and equipment and other things which were of great interest to all. Another guest was Miss Muna Lee, the poet and writer from Puerto Rico, who is up here to see her publishers. Two teas this afternoon and our guests for dinner have grown and grown in number. We started with eight this morning and are sixteen at the moment. I hardly think we can be more before seven-thirty, but it is quite possible!

E.R.
TMsd 5 March 1936, AERP, FDRL