My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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There is no day that does not bring some extra little jobs even though you think nothing new is coming to you. I spent rather a lazy morning, and started for New York at eleven fifty expecting to meet a lady on the train for whom I had made some appointments in New York. Miss Cook and I got on at Poughkeepsie, met my friend, turned over a seat and started talking, when a man came over and said: "Mrs. Roosevelt, do you know about the Railroad Retirement Bill?" I had to confess that my knowledge was slight. I had a vague idea however, that the one passed in a former session of Congress had been declared unconstitutional. My friend handed me his railroad paper so I could read all about it. "This would be a grand bill," he said, "and you should know what is going on."

We arrived in New York and went over to the Biltmore Hotel for lunch. I met some friends and we settled at a table but before I had begun to order luncheon a young man, very well dressed, bent over my chair and said: "Mrs. Roosevelt, I am from Arkansas and have been in New York for thirty-five days and I can not find a job. I wanted to make connections with radio work, but if you want a good chauffeur or valet, I would be glad to come to you. I am really in need of work." I have grown a little wary in my old age and I do not open my heart or my purse as easily as one might suppose, so I thought for a while to whom I could send this young man for investigation. Realizing that he was not a native of New York State, I took his name and told him if I could think of anyone, I would let him know. I had a hopeless feeling but the lady next to me said she was from Arkansas too, and one of the men in her firm would see him and find out about him. That news will go to the young man today. It is funny how sometimes Providence provides you with a solution when you really feel baffled.

And then people ask me: "What do you find to do that keeps you busy?"

E.R.
TMsd 24 February 1936, AERP, FDRL