My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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I just had the pleasure of seeing Helen Howe in some of her monologues. The audience was filled with women from every part of the country, and her first monologue pictured a French girl leaving her fiancee on the dock and starting off for the United States and at once making friends with an American who is to "show her New York." It was very amusing but did not come home to any of us as much as her second one which she calls "The Hundred Percenters." I think many of us saw ourselves in our own organizations and heard ourselves introducing to the press our various heads of committees at the start of some particular day's entertainment. The press in this particular case seems a trifle obtuse! Miss Howe certainly does a wonderfully clever piece of portrayal of the "earnest, organized woman." Her last monologue was called "The Afternoon Sail" and was almost too realistic for the audience. I heard many people around me say that they would have liked to hear a much longer program which is, after all, a triumph for any performer!

Miss Byrd Elyot, a cousin of Admiral Byrd, played the violin with real masterfulness and Mildred Dilling was as always a joy on the harp. I could hardly sit still when Miss Dilling played the "March of the Men of Harlech," which she told us was one of Queen Victoria's favorite tunes. I can vouch for the fact that the men around me could have marched with great ease for all of them were keeping time with their feet.

I am just starting off for Cornell University for the Farm and Home Week which I have been attending annually for several years. I am hoping that the weather will be kind for I should hate to meet with a blizzard on the way. However, one can but trust to luck!

E.R.
TMsd 12 February 1936, AERP, FDRL