My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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REEDSVILLE, W. Va., Sunday—We got off the train this morning at 7:30 at Fairmont, West Virginia. The biggest group that I have ever come with on a day's trip, fifteen in all. Dr. Agger of the Resettlement Division, Miss Cooke and Mr. Pickett, also of that division, were coming down to do some work in Arthurdale. The rest of the party was on a committee of the Department of Commerce on reallocation of industries, and some friends.

The road was distinctly slippery, ice underneath and snow on top, but with an expert driver we reached the home of Mr. and Mrs. Glenn Work, and had a very excellent breakfast, poached eggs and toast and ham and coffee. Those who had work to do went on to Arthurdale and the rest went to a place called Jere to look at some typical miners' houses. Then we proceeded to Arthurdale where Miss Clapp, who is head of the school, greeted us. She showed us the kitchen where three mothers were preparing lunch for the school children. This is a voluntary work on the part of the mothers and the school has its own vegetables planted and taken care of by the fathers of the children. Lunch consisted of mashed potatoes and beans and whole wheat bread and milk.

We saw the wood-working shops, the forge, and the looms which are only just being set up, and then I betook myself to a meeting of the Women's Club while the rest of the party visited some of the homestead houses. The women wanted to know what could be done about the usual things which are wrong in all new houses—pipes which freeze and roofs which leak and cellars which have water in them. They also feared that work was being given to people not on the project to the detriment of their own husbands and finally there were some questions of difficulty in attitude between them and their neighbors in the nearby village. It was finally agreed that it would be best to forget disagreeable things and to keep in mind that the objective of living is to get on with all your neighbors.

E.R.
TMsd 27 January 1936, AERP, FDRL