My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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We had an amusing group at luncheon today, ranging in age from thirteen year old Anne Bullitt, daughter of the Ambassador to Russia, up to myself! I was very much interested to see again young Frank Diaz from Puerto Rico, the son of a woman whom I have known for sometime, who is head of the occupational therapy work in the government hospitals there. Mrs. Diaz brought him up here a year ago last autumn. At the age of fifteen, he was accepted at Catholic University, where he was left with no one to look after him or to make life easy. He feels a heavy responsibility for his widowed mother and the younger children, and has succeeded in getting good marks. One could not wish for a more alert, bright looking youngster. There is no question in my mind that responsibility is a good thing, but it can not be administered artificially, so we can only be grateful when our children have it thrust upon them naturally.

I was glad to see the young Secretary of the Turkish Embassy looking well and strong again, as he was so badly hurt in an automobile accident in New Mexico last summer. I last saw him lying in a hospital in Santa Fe. I think he learned to like our friendly western people.

After lunch, we saw some very interesting movies taken by an American between 1930 and 1935 in Russia. There is much of interest in them, but I can not help feeling that while it is well for us to know the best and the worst about all our fellow human beings wherever they live, we in America have a heritage and background which requires of us development along certain very clear-cut lines and above everything else, we need to know ourselves, not only our own little group or our own little part of the country, but the country as a whole and all its people. This will inspire in us an even greater fervor of spirit to see our country attain the ideals we have always cherished.

E.R.
TMsd 5 January 1936, AERP, FDRL