Center for International Science and Technology Policy

Events Archive – 2009

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2009 Science of Science (SoSP) Workshop: Best Practices in Research & Development Prioritization, Management, and Evaluation.

Wed., Oct. 28
1:00 P.M.- 7: 30 P.M.
Center for International Science and Technology Policy (CISTP), George Washington University

Thu., Oct. 29
8:30 A.M.- 5: 00 P.M.
Center for International Science and Technology Policy (CISTP), George Washington University

The CISTP recently hosted the second annual Science of Science Policy Workshop, in collaboration with the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) and Environmental Protection Agency (EPA).

The 2009 workshop had four primary themes, which were to:

  • Examine methods to set federal research priorities and strategic directions;
  • Explore how metrics are used to improve federal R&D efficiency;
  • Identify ways research evaluations can inform current and future R&D decisions; and
  • Engage with the broader science of science policy community to improve federal R&D decision processes.



Class of 2009 Graduation Party

Fri, May 15, 2009
1:30 P.M.- 3: 00 P.M.
Conference Room, Suite 403
The Elliott School of International Affairs
1957 E Street, NW

The pictures of the event are available here.




T&I Seminar: From Agriculture in the Tropics to Research and Technology Based Tropical Agriculture: The Brazilian Experience

Wednesday, May 13
5:30 p.m. - 7:30 p.m.
Lindner Family Commons, 6th Floor
The Elliott School of International Affairs
1957 E Street, NW

The speaker's presentation file is here.

Dr. Felix Humberto Franca, Embrapa Labex-USA at USDA /Agricultural Research Service, Beltsville, MD.

Felix H. Franca is a researcher of Embrapa-The Brazilian Agricultural Research Corporation since 1977. He received the B.S. degree in agronomy from University of Brasilia in Brazil, M.Sc. in entomology from Texas A&M University and a Ph.D. degree in Entomology and Plant Breeding from Cornell University. He was Research Fellow with the Brazilian National Research Council [CNPq], from 1993 to 2002 and his research has been published in Latin America, as well as in Entomologia Experimentalis et Applicata, Journal of the American Society for Horticultural Science and American Potato Journal. Previously, he was the executive secretary of the Horticultural Sectorial Chamber of the Ministry of Agriculture in Brazil, Fruits & Vegetables Research Program and MacroProgram II - Sustainability and Competitiveness of the Agricultural Sector at Embrapa. Currently, he is the coordinator of Labex-USA, a virtual laboratory/partnership model that explores new and mutually beneficial collaborations in agricultural research between Embrapa and USDA Agricultural Research Service and Forest Service.

Presentation abstract: The widespread concern that undeveloped countries may succumb to famine and diseases due to food shortages is not recent. To address that, concerted international responses were implemented in the 1950s, 60s and 70s with relative success in a few countries. In the last 35 years Brazil evolved from a large importer of agricultural goods into one of the major global players in the agricultural sector. Public investment in education, infrastructure and research and development and innovation in agriculture provided the foundation for change. One of the major strategic decisions for transforming the country from a stage of food dependency subsistence low input agriculture or "agriculture in the tropics" to a commercial technologically advanced food sustainable/crop production system or "tropical agriculture" was the creation of Embrapa-The Brazilian Agricultural Research Corporation in 1973. Embrapa's experiences in north-south/south-south collaborative networks for innovation in the last three decades and prospects for the future will be presented.

Please RSVP to cistp@gwu.edu with your name and affiliation.




A Conversation about Careers in the Department of State and US Agency for International Development

Wednesday, May 6
5:30 p.m. - 7:00 p.m.
ROOM 505
The Elliott School of International Affairs
1957 E Street, NW

Panelists will include

Alice Blayne Allard
Alice is a senior foreign affairs officer with the Department of State, Bureau of Near Eastern Affairs where she currently serves as coordinator for the G8-Broader Middle East and North Africa Initiative. She is responsible for U.S. engagement and support for the initiative within the multilateral framework. Previously, she served as a public affairs officer for the Bureau, and was appointed to the National Security Council as Assistant Press Secretary and Director of Public Affairs, where she managed outreach strategies, arranged media appearances, and engaged the press on a daily basis to communicate key messages on high profile, complex and sometimes controversial issues and activities with respect to U.S. foreign policy. Prior to joining the State Department in 2000, Blayne-Allard was Assistant Director for International Studies at Goucher College. She holds a Master of Arts degree from American University and has done doctoral work at the University of Maryland, College Park.

Sheila A. Young,
As a Michigan native, Sheila is a veteran development worker with nearly 20 years of experience in Central America, West Africa and South and East Asia. She has a Masters in environmental science and policy from George Mason University and is a Foreign Service Officer with the US Agency for International Development. She is currently in Russian language training in Arlington, Virginia, in preparation for her next assignment as USAID's Director of the Economic Growth Office in Baku, Azerbaijan."

Dr. Crystal K. Meriwether
Crystal joined the Department of State as a Foreign Service Officer in 2000. She has served in Finland as a Public Affairs Officer; in Argentina as a Consular Officer and as an Environment, Science, Technology and Health Officer; and in Washington, D.C. as an Education Program Manager for North Africa and the Middle East. Presently she is the Department of State's Diplomat-in-Residence Fellow in "Science, Technology and Foreign Policy" at George Washington University. She previously spent 30 years in education as a superintendent, principal, teacher, university instructor, developer of curriculum, personnel and organizations, and consultant serving in public/private, urban/ suburban education in the USA and abroad. She received her Ph.D. in Educational Administration from the University of Minnesota.

Jehan Jones
Jehan is a U.S. Foreign Service Officer who has served abroad in the Dominican Republic and Ghana. She is currently working in the Office of International Health and BioDefense in the Bureau of Oceans, Environment, and Science. In 2003 she received her Master's in International Affairs. She has a Bachelors Degree in Individualized Studies from George Mason University.




Bromley lecture: Policy as Science

Wednesday, April 29, 2009
5:30 p.m. - 7:30 p.m.
Lindner Family Commons, 6th Floor
The Elliott School of International Affairs
1957 E Street, NW

The speaker's presentation file is here. Pictures taken during the event are available here.

John H. Marburger, III,
University Professor
Departments of Physics and Electrical Engineering, SUNY-SB

John H. Marburger, III, served as Science Advisor to the President and Director of the Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP) during the George W. Bush Administration (2001-2009). Prior to his federal service, he was Director of Brookhaven National Laboratory from 1998, and the third President of Stony Brook University (1980-1994). He came to Long Island in 1980 from the University of Southern California where he had been a Professor of Physics and Electrical Engineering, serving consecutively as Physics Department Chairman and Dean of the College of Letters, Arts and Sciences in the 1970's. Professor Marburger attended Princeton University (A.B. Physics 1962) and Stanford University (Ph.D. Applied Physics 1967). Marburger's tenure as the President's Science Advisor, the longest in history, began immediately following the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001 and included major policy initiatives associated with the establishment of the Department of Homeland Security, re-orientation of the nation's space policy following the crash of the Columbia space shuttle in 2003, the U.S. re-entry in the international nuclear fusion program ITER, and the American Competitiveness Initiative that aimed to double federal funding for the physical sciences and engineering. He and senior OSTP officials led U.S. delegations to critical international negotiating meetings on internet governance, telecommunications spectrum allocations, and climate change including the influential summary reports of the International Panel on Climate Change, securing Administration support for the reports as a foundation for subsequent Administration policymaking. Serving during a time of deep political and ideological divisions, especially regarding climate change and human embryonic stem cell research, Marburger brought high standards of fairness and objectivity to the science policy process, and launched a movement to strengthen the "science of science policy" that achieved international recognition.

Please RSVP to cistp@gwu.edu with your name and affiliation.

The Bromley lecture is co-sponsored by the Center for International Science and Technology Policy, GWU and the Telfer School of Management, University of Ottawa.




T&I Seminar: Federal R&D Employment Growth

Wednesday, April 15
5 p.m. - 6:30 p.m.
Lindner Family Commons, 6th Floor
The Elliott School of International Affairs
1957 E Street, NW

The speaker's presentation file is here.

Professor Albert Link, University of North Carolina at Greensboro.

The economic impact of federal R&D spending has long been a topic of policy interest.  The literature on the subject includes case studies of federally-funded initiatives, econometric analyses of the statistical relationship between federal R&D and total factor productivity, and evaluations of the social impact of federal research programs.  To date, there has not been a systematic investigation of the impact of federal R&D on employment growth.
   Professor Link will present his findings about the impact of Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) program awards on the employment growth of
recipient company.  He will conclude that, per company, the average employment gain attributable to SBIR support has been between 21 and 41 employees, and the average employment gain per million dollars awarded has been between 32 and 65 employees.

Albert N. Link is professor of economics at the University of North Carolina at Greensboro.  He received the B.S. degree in mathematics from the University of Richmond and the Ph.D. degree in economics from Tulane University.  His research focuses on innovation policy, the economics of R&D, and university entrepreneurship. He is the Editor-in-Chief of the Journal of Technology Transfer.  Professor Link's most recent books include: Government as Entrepreneur (with Jamie Link, Oxford University Press, forthcoming summer 2009), Cyber Security: Economic Strategies and Public Policy Alternatives (Edward Elgar, 2008) and Entrepreneurship, Innovation, and Technological Change (Oxford University Press, 2007). His scholarship has appeared in such journals at the American Economic Review, Journal of Political Economy, Review of Economics and Statistics, Economica, and Research Policy.  Currently, Professor Link is serving as the vice-chairperson of the Team of Specialists of the Innovation and Competitivness Policies Committee of the United Nation's Economic Commission for Europe. 

Light refreshment available. Please RSVP to cistp@gwu.edu with your name and affiliation.




GWU-GMU Research Seminar: Who licenses out patents and why? Lessons from a business survey jointly with Dominique Guellec (OECD)

Thursday, April 2
12 p.m. - 1:30 p.m.
CISTP Conference Room, Suite 403,
The Elliott School of International Affairs
1957 E Street, NW

Abstract: The increasing importance of licensing for innovation is supported by ample anecdotal evidence. However, statistics on this topic are scarce. The OECD, together with the European Patent Office and the University of Tokyo , carried out a business survey on the licensing-out of patents. The goal was to investigate the intensity of licensing to affiliated and non-affiliated companies, its evolution, the characteristics, motivations and obstacles met by companies doing or willing to license. The target population was patent holders: 600 European firms and 1 600 Japanese firms responded to the survey, in the second half of 2007. The results show that patent licensing is widespread among patenting firms: around one company in five in Europe licenses patents to non-affiliated partners, whereas more than one in four does so in Japan. The relationship between size of the firm and probability to license out is U-shaped: small firms and large firms are more likely to license out their patented inventions. In Europe , SMEs have more difficulties to license out their patents than large firms. The major barrier to licensing out patent markets is informational (identifying partners). Finally, we also find that more than one third of young European firms (born after 2000) deem patents as quite or very important to convince private investors and venture capitalists to provide them with funds.

The speaker's presentation file is here.

About the speaker: Pluvia holds a Ph. Doctorate in Applied Economics from the Paris School of Economics. Part of her thesis entitled "Innovation strategies and the influence of intellectual property rights" has been published in leading academic journals such as the International Journal of Industrial Organisation and the Industrial and Corporate Change. She was Post-Doctorate researcher at the Catholic University of Leuven in Belgium where she conducted research on industry-science linkages and innovation. Later, she was Associate Professor at the University of Paris IX Dauphine where she taught economics of intellectual property.

She joined the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development in July 2006 as an Economist in the Science, Technology and Industry Directorate. Her work focused on the statistical analysis of science and technology and the measurement of inventive activities. She is author of the new OECD Patent Statistics Manual.

Pluvia has conducted research on the impact of external sources of knowledge on in-house research and development (R&D), globalisation of technology and the strategic use of patents. She is currently working on the drivers of offshore R&D and the measurement of international circulation of knowledge.

Lunch available. Please RSVP to cistp@gwu.edu.




STGlobal Consortium

Saturday, March 28 and Sunday, March 29

CISTP co-sponsored the STGlobal Consortium at AAAS in Washington DC.
Read more




Global Space Commerce and the Role of the US Government – An Industry Perspective

Wednesday, March 11
5 p.m. - 6:30 p.m.
Lindner Family Commons, 6th Floor
The Elliott School of International Affairs
1957 E Street, NW

Edward Morris, Executive Director, ITT Space Systems Division

The private sector exploitation of space, defined as space commerce, has seen significant growth over the past decade and expectations remain high for future new business opportunities. The challenge for the U.S. government is how to support our domestic space industry in a global environment that offers both increased opportunities and competition. What role should the government play to enhance U.S. space commerce? Do current space policies recognize the importance of international competition and the impact on our national security? The proliferation of foreign commercial space systems in the global marketplace is a very complex issue. How should the government view domestic industry desires to use foreign space capabilities to remain internationally competitive? How does the government balance the need for a competitive U.S. industry and requirement to protect sensitive technologies? Ed Morris will review the impact of current U.S. space policy on global space commerce and the ability of domestic firms to compete for business. He will also draw on his private sector experience to discuss the practical impact of government policies on the U.S. space industrial base.

Please RSVP to cistp@gwu.edu with your name and affiliation.





GMW-GWU Seminar: Innovative Innovation Policies: Case Studies from the U.S., Israel, the Netherlands and Denmark

Thursday, March 12

Guy Ben-Ari, Fellow, Center for Strategic and International Studies

In a dynamic, knowledge-based global economy, innovation is the new currency of global competition. Yet despite this, public policies for fostering innovation - and thereby generating economic growth - usually lack creativity and novelty. This has prompted economists and S&T policy experts to call for a new approach to innovation policy. The presentation explores this topic using case studies of national innovation policies that were themselves innovative. Analyzing these case studies uncovers interesting findings on how the level of innovativeness of an innovation policy affects that policy's success and how various components of innovativeness in that policy contribute to its success.

The presentation file is available here.
5 p.m. - 6:30 p.m.
Lindner Family Commons, 6th Floor
The Elliott School of International Affairs
1957 E Street, NW




Global Space Commerce and the Role of the U.S. Government – An Industry Perspective

Wednesday, March 11
5 p.m. - 6:30 p.m.
Lindner Family Commons, 6th Floor
The Elliott School of International Affairs
1957 E Street, NW

Edward Morris, Executive Director, ITT Space Systems Division

The private sector exploitation of space, defined as space commerce, has seen significant growth over the past decade and expectations remain high for future new business opportunities. The challenge for the U.S. government is how to support our domestic space industry in a global environment that offers both increased opportunities and competition. What role should the government play to enhance U.S. space commerce? Do current space policies recognize the importance of international competition and the impact on our national security? The proliferation of foreign commercial space systems in the global marketplace is a very complex issue. How should the government view domestic industry desires to use foreign space capabilities to remain internationally competitive? How does the government balance the need for a competitive U.S. industry and requirement to protect sensitive technologies? Ed Morris will review the impact of current U.S. space policy on global space commerce and the ability of domestic firms to compete for business. He will also draw on his private sector experience to discuss the practical impact of government policies on the U.S. space industrial base.

Please RSVP to cistp@gwu.edu with your name and affiliation.




Between Innovation and Democracy: Perspectives from Europe on the Governance of Emerging Technologies

Wednesday, February 18
4 p.m. - 6 p.m.

James Wilsdon, Director of the Science Policy Centre at the Royal Society

Advances in science and technology constantly give rise to new economic, social and ethical questions. But how well do systems of governance and regulation keep pace? Spurred on by controversies over GM crops and stem cell research, scientists across Europe have gradually started to involve the public more in their work. They looked first to education as the answer, then to processes of dialogue and participation. But these efforts have not yet proved sufficient. Often, people want answers to the more fundamental questions at stake in any new technology: Who owns it? Who benefits from it? To what purposes will it be directed? Drawing on recent examples, such as nanotechnologies and synthetic biology, James Wilsdon will describe how approaches to the governance of emerging technologies are changing in Europe, and explore the implications of this for a world where globalization is rapidly changing who does science and where.

James Wilsdon is Director of the Science Policy Centre at the Royal Society, the UK's national academy of science. From 2001 to 2008, James worked at the UK think tank Demos, first as head of Strategy, then as Head of Science and Innovation. Most recently, Dr. Wilsdon was also Director of the Atlas of Ideas' project, which explored the changing geography of science and innovation in Asia, Africa, Latin America and the Middle East.

Co-sponsored by: The Center for Policy on Emerging Technologies; the Global Alliance for Linkages in Science; The Center for Science Policy and Outcomes, Arizona State University; and The Center for Innovation at the U.S. Institute of Peace.

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Phone: 202.994.7292
Fax: 202.994.1639
Email: cistp@gwu.edu

Address:
Center for International Science and Technology Policy
1957 E Street, N.W., Suite 403
Washington, D.C. 20052