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University Bulletin: Undergraduate Programs The George Washington University  

 
   
 

SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING AND APPLIED SCIENCE

Dean D.S. Dolling

Associate Deans B. Narahari, C.E. Korman, R. Riffat

The School of Engineering and Applied Science was organized in 1884 as the Corcoran Scientific School of Columbian University, named in honor of William W. Corcoran, president of the University’s Board of Trustees from 1869 to 1888. The school was among the first to accept women for degree candidacy in engineering. While the organization and offerings of the school have evolved over the years, through most of its history its programs have been characterized by an emphasis on principles guiding the advancement of technology.

Through its five departments—Civil and Environmental Engineering, Computer Science, Electrical and Computer Engineering, Engineering Management and Systems Engineering, and Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering—the School of Engineering and Applied Science offers undergraduate programs leading to the Bachelor of Science (in biomedical engineering, civil engineering, computer engineering, computer science, electrical engineering, mechanical engineering, and systems engineering) and the Bachelor of Arts (in applied science and technology and in computer science). Combined bachelor’s/master’s degree programs are available. In cooperation with the GW Law School, an integrated engineering and law program leading to the B.S. or B.A. and J.D. is offered.

The School offers graduate study leading to the degrees of Master of Science and Doctor of Philosophy and to the professional degrees of Engineer and Applied Scientist. Several graduate certificate programs are offered as well.

Extensive and varied laboratories and computing facilities support the undergraduate programs. The School strongly supports co-curricular activities to broaden and deepen its students’ overall educational programs, including an extensive array of internship opportunities at government laboratories and private companies, both in the Washington area and elsewhere. Other opportunities are engineering-type team competitions, research projects, and the SEAS student government organization, the Engineers’ Council.

Residence

Sixty credit hours must be completed in residence. Full-time students normally complete their programs in four years.

SEAS Regulations

Advising—Every entering undergraduate student is assigned a professional advisor to assist in orientation in the professional discipline. Faculty advisors counsel students on their programs of study, achievement and maintenance of satisfactory scholastic performance, professional development, and extracurricular activity as part of the educational process. The advisor represents the student in all cases requiring faculty action. Students must obtain their advisor’s approval of their program of study prior to registration for each academic semester and summer session. The advisor’s approval must be obtained before registering for a course at another institution. Until the work required for the degree is completed, students must consult with their advisors in all academic matters. However, an advisor may not deny entry into any course or activity to which the student is entitled under the regulations of the School.

Assignment of Transfer Credit—Transfer students should complete a Transfer of Credit worksheet, available in the SEAS Office of Undergraduate Student Services, Advising, and Records and present the worksheet to the faculty advisor for approval. See Admissions in this Bulletin for more detail on residence and transfer credit policies.

Credit by Examination—See Admissions in this Bulletin for information on credit assignment for College Board Advanced Placement Tests.

Registered SEAS students may take examinations in some academic departments for waiver of or credit for a specific course upon approval of the appropriate department chair; before the test is administered, the student must have demonstrated sufficient preparation to warrant being given the test. An examination for credit is not allowed if an examination for waiver has been successfully completed.

Makeup of Credit for Waived Courses—Waiver of a required course requires approval of the student’s faculty advisor and department chair. If a course required by the SEAS curriculum is waived, the corresponding credit hours must be earned by satisfactory completion of a university-level academic course, either technical or nontechnical, approved by the student’s faculty advisor. Only if the substituted course would normally be considered part of the student’s curriculum will the grade earned be used in determining grade-point average, Dean’s List, probation, and suspension.

Scholarship Requirements—To be eligible for graduation a student must have at least (1) an overall grade-point average of 2.0, (2) an overall GPA of 2.0 for the program taken at SEAS, and (3) a GPA of 2.2 for technical courses required in the fifth through eighth semesters. All computer science courses taken in the Bachelor of Arts major in computer science are considered technical for this purpose. Grades used to calculate the grade-point average include all grades earned at GW and through the Consortium while the student is enrolled at GW. (In determining probation, suspension, or Dean’s List status, the grades used are for academic courses taken in fulfillment of degree requirements and not for remedial courses or those taken to make up deficiencies. For example, EAP courses and non-SEAS courses taken in excess of the number needed to fulfill degree requirements are not considered.)

Probation—Full-time students are placed on probation if their grade-point average is below 2.0 for one semester or if they receive more than one grade of F in one semester or summer session. Part-time students are placed on probation if their GPA is below 2.0 or they have received more than one grade of F after accumulating 12 credit hours; a new grading period is considered to begin once this accumulation is reached. Students on probation who earn a GPA of at least 2.0 (for 12 or more credit hours) during the semester on probation but also receive a grade of F are continued on probation; students in this category who receive two or more Fs are suspended.

Full-time students are removed from probation when the GPA is at least 2.0 with no grade of F during the semester on probation. Part-time students are removed from probation when the GPA is at least 2.0 and they receive no grade of F for the next 12 credit hours after being placed on probation.

Suspension—The following circumstances constitute grounds for suspension: (1) two grades of F any time during a probation period (part-time students who receive two grades of F while on probation will be suspended at the time of receipt of the second F); (2) four grades of F in any semester (or the equivalent for part-time students); (3) placement on probation for a third time; (4) a cumulative grade-point average of (a) 1.5 or below at the end of the sophomore year or upon completion of the 63rd credit in the student’s curriculum, (b) 1.9 or below at the end of the junior year or upon completion of the 97th credit in the student’s curriculum, or (c) below 2.0 at any time during the senior year.

Department faculty may designate additional courses to be taken and specify grades to be received by students who fail to meet but come close to meeting the graduation requirements; suspension may be held in abeyance for a stated period in this circumstance.

Students readmitted on probation will be suspended if they do not attain a minimum GPA of 2.0 during their first semester (12 or more credit hours) or if they receive more than one grade of F during the period.

Once suspended, a student may not have that suspension rescinded by a grade change at a later date, although the student may apply for readmission noting the grade change. Students who have been suspended may not apply for readmission until one year after the suspension. To be considered for readmission, a student must have undertaken academic work at another institution, primarily in mathematics, science, or engineering, during the year of suspension and earned a GPA of at least 2.7. Applications for readmission are reviewed by the respective departments.

Dean’s Honors and Commendation Lists—The names of all students who, in a given semester, take 12 or more graded credit hours in course work that applies to graduation requirements (or in any additional SEAS courses taken) may appear on the Dean’s Honors List if a grade-point average of 3.5 is achieved or on the Dean’s Commendation List if a GPA of 3.0 is achieved. No disciplinary action may have been taken against the student, and no more than one grade below B− and no grades below C− may have been earned. A student who receives a notation of I (Incomplete) during a semester will not be placed on the Dean’s Honors or Commendation List for that semester unless the I is changed to I followed by a letter grade within 30 days of the end of the marking period and the student continues to meet all the requirements for the Dean’s Honors or Commendation List.

Incompletes—Conditions under which the notation of I (Incomplete) may be assigned are described under University Regulations. If the I is not changed to I followed by a letter grade within 30 days, decisions on probation, removal from probation, and suspension will be made with the information on hand, in conformance with SEAS regulations. Although the I may remain on the record for a maximum of one year, the instructor should normally set a much briefer period within which the uncompleted work (usually the final examination or required paper) must be made up. The I cannot be removed by the student’s reregistering for the course here or taking its equivalent elsewhere. An I that is not removed after one calendar year or at the time of graduation of the student, whichever occurs first, will be changed on the permanent record to a grade of IF. When the I is changed to a letter grade, the I followed by the letter grade (e.g., IB) will appear on the student’s record. The grade for which the I is changed will be applied to the grade report for the semester or summer session during which the change is made for the purposes of determining probation, suspension, grade-point average, and Dean’s and other honor lists.

Pass/No Pass Grading System—SEAS students may not take courses required for graduation on the pass/no pass (P/NP) grading system. They may, however, take courses outside their regular SEAS academic program under this grading system.

Academic Work Load—A full-time undergraduate student who is not on probation may register for no more than 21 credit hours. Students on probation may not register for more than 13 credit hours. A student employed more than 24 hours a week may take no more than 10 credit hours. In exceptional cases these limits may be exceeded with the faculty advisor’s permission.

Humanities and Social Sciences Electives—With the assistance of the advisor, each student in a SEAS B.S. program chooses a set of elective courses in the humanities and social sciences. For most B.S. curricula, these normally consist of a minimum of 18 credit hours, divided equally between the humanities and social sciences. Each 9-credit group must include two courses in one subject area and a third course in a different subject area. When a foreign language is taken as part of the humanities requirement, the following rules apply: (1) the foreign language studied must not be a native language of the student, unless the courses taken are literature courses; (2) if the student has studied the language previously, he or she must first take a placement test given by the language department concerned and enroll in a course recommended by that department; and (3) the student may use at most two foreign language courses to satisfy SEAS’s humanities requirements. If two courses are used, they must be in the same foreign language. The advisor must approve the program.

Since the SEAS curricula are, by necessity, oriented toward technical subjects, the humanities and social sciences electives should be courses that broaden the student’s outlook. Courses in areas such as anthropology, economics, foreign languages, geography, history, literature, philosophy, political science, psychology, and sociology are considered appropriate.

Mission Statements and Educational Objectives

Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering

Mission Statement—The mission of the Department of Civil and Environmental engineering is to provide an academic environment where professional education can be pursued, scholarly research in science and technology can be conducted, and the interest of the public can be served through the advancement of knowledge.

In pursuit of this mission the administration, faculty, and staff join to provide a broad based, rigorous professional education in civil engineering at the undergraduate level, provide graduate education at the master’s level in major areas of civil engineering, provide doctoral programs in selective areas of excellence within civil engineering, and serve the local community, citizens of the nation, and the people of the world.

Educational Objectives—The civil engineering undergraduate program of study prepares its graduates with the following career and professional accomplishments. Technical knowledge: students are enabled to use their technical knowledge and expertise in mathematics, science, and engineering to identify, formulate, and solve problems involving design, experimentation, and analysis of a wide variety of civil engineering applications. Team skills: students develop leadership skills, demonstrate proficiency in all forms of communication, and perform well in a multidisciplinary team environment. Continuous education: students recognize the need for continuing their education through graduate studies, continuous education opportunities, and/or self-education. Professionalism: students are prepared to exercise the highest standards of personal and professional integrity, demonstrate an understanding of the ethical and professional issues related to the procurement of work, and provide coordination between the design and construction aspects of the civil engineering profession.

These objectives are accomplished through a rigorous curriculum that emphasizes fundamentals in basic sciences, mathematics, humanities, and engineering in five major areas of civil engineering: environmental engineering, geotechnical engineering, structural engineering, water resources engineering, and transportation engineering. The curriculum enables students to use modern engineering tools to work both individually and in teams. The curriculum contains a well-structured set of courses that enable students to develop the required analytical, experimental, and design skills.

Educational Outcomes—The civil engineering undergraduate program of study prepares its graduates with the following career and professional accomplishments: an ability to apply knowledge of mathematics, science, and engineering; design and conduct experiments and analyze and interpret data; design a system, component, or process to meet desired needs within realistic constraints such as economic, environmental, social, political, health and safety, manufacturability, and sustainability constraints; identify, formulate, and solve engineering problems; use the techniques, skills, and modern engineering tools necessary for engineering practice; function on multidisciplinary teams; and communicate effectively. Students are provided with the broad education necessary to understand the impact of engineering solutions in a global economic, environmental, and social context; a knowledge of contemporary issues; an understanding of professional and ethical responsibility; and a recognition of the need for and ability to engage in lifelong learning.

The civil engineering undergraduate program curriculum includes coverage of proficiency in mathematics through differential equations, probability and statistics, calculus-based physics, and general chemistry; proficiency in a minimum of four recognized major civil engineering areas; the ability to conduct laboratory experiments and to critically analyze and interpret data in more than one of the recognized major civil engineering areas; the ability to perform civil engineering design by means of design experiences integrated throughout the professional component of the curriculum; and an understanding of professional practice issues such as procurement of work, bidding versus quality-based selection processes, how the design professionals and the construction professions interact to construct a project, the importance of professional licensure and continuing education, and/or other professional practice issues.

Department of Computer Science

Mission Statement—The mission of the Department of Computer Science is to serve the global community by providing high-quality computer science education, research, and professional service and to advance computer technology in areas of selective excellence.

Educational Objectives—The program has been developed to prepare graduates who, in the years following graduation, will earn an advanced degree in computer science or related disciplines or a professional degree (such as law, business, medicine), or be gainfully employed in the computer or IT industry with the ability to apply skills and knowledge learned while an undergraduate at GW, and who will conduct themselves professionally and ethically, work effectively in teams, and communicate effectively to both technical and non-technical audiences.

Educational Outcomes—By the time of graduation, a computer science student will have: (1) learned to apply principles from the fundamentals of computer science, including discrete structures, data structures, algorithms, and the theory of computing; (2) acquired an understanding of the hardware and software architecture of computer systems, including architecture, operating systems, databases, languages, and networks; (3) participated effectively in team projects and team activities, and acquired an understanding of: (a) the overall social and professional context in which computing activities take place; (b) the global and local impact of computing; and (c) professional, ethical, legal, security, and social issues and responsibilities; (4) demonstrated an application of software engineering principles through completion of a challenging capstone project requiring specification, design, and implementation; and (5) conveyed technical knowledge in an effective manner through written and oral communications.

Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering

Mission Statement—The mission of the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering is to motivate and inspire our students by providing high-caliber, fully integrated programs in electrical, computer, and biomedical engineering in order to provide leadership in a rapidly evolving global information society in the service of humanity and to advance the state of knowledge in our disciplines by actively pursuing scholarly research for publication and dissemination.

Educational Objectives—The objectives of the programs are to educate students in the principles of engineering, including cognizance of their responsibilities as members of society. The engineering education is based on the sciences and the principles of design. Social responsibilities are instilled through a balanced program in the humanities and social sciences as well as coverage of specific topics in professional ethics and social responsibilities. The programs provide students with a solid foundation in electrical, computer, and biomedical engineering through a balanced curriculum integrating the underlying scientific and mathematical knowledge with the latest technological developments. The curriculum is designed to produce engineers capable of functioning in the present technological environment and of adapting to future directions of the profession. Specifically, the programs aim to teach students how to analyze and implement complex interdisciplinary engineering projects; to give students a strong foundation for graduate studies in their field; to prepare students for competitive and challenging industrial applications; to teach students how to use state-of-the-art computer tools for solving engineering problems; to expose students to hands-on engineering experience through laboratory courses; to cultivate students’ abilities to communicate and work effectively in teams; and to help students develop an understanding of the ethical issues and global perspectives arising in the practice of the engineering profession.

Department of Engineering Management and Systems Engineering

Mission Statement—The mission of the Department of Engineering Management and Systems Engineering is to deliver an integrated program of research, teaching, and public service to the technology community. The Department develops creative leadership to bridge dynamic, complex technologies and societal needs. This includes delivering instruction in the management of technology and in systems engineering, operations research, and allied fields to undergraduate and graduate students who are preparing to assume leadership roles as technology professionals. Our education programs provide an understanding of the managerial role, analysis of the diverse functions of technology-based organizations, and instruction in modern management and mathematical analysis and modeling tools as they apply to formulating and executing decisions in engineering and scientific organizations. Our research programs feature research in the management of technology; fundamental and applied research in systems engineering and operations research, with a particularly strong interest in stochastic analysis and system optimization; sponsorship from government, industry, and the technology community; and a strong presence in refereed professional journals and leadership in professional societies.

Educational Objectives—The systems engineering undergraduate program of study prepares its graduates for work as systems engineers in a variety of professional fields and for continuing study at the graduate level. The educational objectives include conveying the expectations of an ethical and professional work environment, so that graduates will be prepared to fully engage with both technical and non-technical colleagues.

Educational Outcomes—By the time of graduation, a systems engineering student will have (1) learned to apply the fundamentals of systems engineering, including needs elicitation, requirements elaboration, design option analyses, architectural trade studies, system traceability methods, configuration baseline and management, and engineering change process; (2) acquired an understanding of complexity in large systems development and operations; (3) developed communications skills appropriate to the conveyance of complex systems information to a variety of audiences; (4) participated effectively in team-based projects; and (5) demonstrated the application of systems engineering skills through the development and completion of a large capstone project.

Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering

Mission Statement—The mission of the Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering is to educate students to become professional mechanical and aerospace engineers who are confident in their understanding of science and technology, who are creative in the face of new challenges, and whose analytical skill and thirst for lifelong learning will open new career horizons; to contribute to society through the conduct of relevant research at the forefront of mechanical and aerospace engineering knowledge and to provide opportunities for students to participate and learn through mentorship with the faculty; and to serve the nation, the community, and the university.

Educational Objectives—The mechanical engineering program provides an integrated curriculum aimed at producing graduates who develop successful careers in mechanical engineering practice or in science and technology. Graduates will be prepared to accomplish the following within a few years after graduation: (1) practice mechanical engineering in industry or government, applying knowledge and skills acquired in the program to the design of engineering systems and devices and the analysis and solution of engineering problems of complex scope; and/or (2) be successful in advanced education, research and development, or other creative efforts in engineering, science, and technology; and/or (3) apply engineering skills while pursuing careers in other professions, such as law, medicine, business, or public policy (this objective is included to reflect the program’s patent law and medical preparation options and will apply to a selected group of graduates of the program); (4) conduct themselves in a responsible and ethical manner, cognizant of the social, environmental, and economic impact of engineering and technology on society; (5) embark upon a process of lifelong learning in their profession; and (6) enter into leadership roles in technological development or local, national, or global economic development.

Bachelor of Science Degree Programs

Check with the department concerned for total credit requirements for the degree programs that follow.

The listed curriculums on the following pages all assume electives to be at least 3 credit hours. Credit toward the degree is not allowed for LSPA courses. The key to abbreviations for course designations can be found at the beginning of the Courses of Instruction section.

Biomedical Engineering

Offered by the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, this innovative program provides a strong foundation in the basic sciences as well as the theory and practice of biomedical engineering. In consultation with their faculty advisor, students choose an area of specialization from topics including biomechanics, instrumentation, and medical preparation. Distinguishing features of the program are its specialty laboratories, summer internships in metropolitan-area private or federal laboratories, and a capstone design sequence.

First Semester—UW 1020; SEAS 1001; ECE 1010; BiSc 1111; Chem 1111; Math 1231.

Second Semester—BiSc 1112; ECE 1020; Chem 1112; Math 1232; Phys 1021.

Third Semester—ApSc 2113; ECE 2110, 2810; Math 2233; Phys 1022.

Fourth Semester—CSci 1121; ECE 2115, 2140, 2210, 2815; humanities or social sciences elective.

Fifth Semester—CSci 1132; ECE 3220, 3910, 3820, two technical electives.

Sixth Semester—ApSc 3115; ECE 3915, 4820; two humanities or social sciences electives; technical elective.

Seventh Semester—ECE 4920; MAE 4168; Phys 2127; humanities or social sciences elective; technical elective.

Eighth Semester—ECE 4925, 4825; Phys 2128; Phil 2135; humanities or social sciences elective; technical elective.

All technical electives must be approved by the academic advisor. More information can be found at www.ece.gwu.edu.

Civil Engineering

Civil engineering encompasses those branches of engineering most closely related to the control and improvement of our environment and of the physical conditions of life. Civil engineers apply many technical specialties in order to plan, design, and construct projects that range from buildings and transportation systems to space stations and space habitats.

First Semester—UW 1020; SEAS 1001; CE 1010; Math 1231; Chem 1111; humanities or social sciences elective.

Second Semester—CSci 1041; MAE 1004; Math 1232; Phys 1021; humanities or social sciences elective.

Third Semester—ApSc 2057, 2113; Math 2233; Phys 1022; humanities or social sciences elective.

Fourth Semester—ApSc 2058; CE 2210, 2220, 2710; Geol 1001; humanities or social sciences elective.

Fifth Semester—ApSc 3115; CE 3230, 3110, 3111, 3720; MAE 3126; humanities or social sciences elective.

Sixth Semester—CE 3240, 3611, 3521, 3310, 3610, 3520; humanities or social sciences elective.

Seventh Semester—CE 4410, 4411, 4320, 4620, 4530; technical elective selected from list below.

Eighth Semester—CE 4330, 4340, 6403; technical elective; design elective.

Technical Electives—CE 4810, 4820, 6201, 6301, 6302, 6202, 6320, 6401, 6402, 6405, 6503, 6504, 6505, 6601, 6602, 6603, 6604, 6605, 6608, 6609, 6721, 6722, 6800; EMSE 6410.

Design Electives—CE 6201, 6301, 6320, 6502, 6602, 6603, 6706.

The Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering also offers the Bachelor of Science major in civil engineering with the options listed below. Additional information on the options can be found at www.cee.seas.gwu.edu.

Environmental Engineering Option in Civil Engineering—The environmental engineering option leads to a bachelor’s degree in civil engineering. Students are prepared to work in technical environmental fields such as water and wastewater treatment, hazardous waste treatment, and environmental impact assessment. Students are also prepared to pursue graduate study in environmental engineering.

Sustainability Option in Civil Engineering—The sustainability option leads to a bachelor’s degree in civil engineering. Students are prepared to work in sustainable development—the challenge of meeting human needs for natural resources, industrial products, energy, food, transportation, shelter, and effective waste management while conserving and protecting environmental quality and the natural resource base essential for future development.

Transportation Engineering Option in Civil Engineering—The transportation engineering option leads to a bachelor’s degree in civil engineering. Transportation engineers design, construct, maintain, and upgrade transportation facilities, including highways, railroads, airfields, and ports. The program emphasizes automotive, highway, and multi-modal transportation safety and security.

Medical Preparation Option in Civil Engineering—The medical preparation option leads to a bachelor’s degree in civil engineering and prepares the student for application to medical school. The student is also prepared to work in research and development or to pursue graduate study in the fields of biomechanics and biotechnology.

Computer Engineering

Computer engineering combines electronic design, computer architecture, programming of computing systems, computer networks, and applied mathematics. Students in the program are prepared in the theory and application of hardware and software design, computer networks, embedded systems, and very large scale integrated (VLSI) circuit design and applications. Students can take electives in advanced topics, such as optical networks, broadband wireless networks, and technologies for the next generation of information systems.

First Semester—UW 1020; ECE 1010; Chem 1111; Math 1231; SEAS 1001; elective.

Second Semester—CSci 1121, 1311; ECE 1020; Math 1232; Phys 1021; elective.

Third Semester—ApSc 2113; CSci 1132; ECE 2110; Math 2233; Phys 1022.

Fourth Semester—ApSc 3115; ECE 2115, 2210, 2140; elective.

Fifth Semester—CSci 3411; ECE 3220, 3130, 3520, 3910, 3135.

Sixth Semester—ECE 3310, 3415, 3425, 3915, 3525, 3515; elective.

Seventh Semester—ECE 4140, 4920, 4535; two electives.

Eighth Semester—ECE 4150, 4925; Phil 2135; two electives.

The eight electives must include three 3-credit courses in the social sciences, two 3-credit courses in the humanities, and three 3-credit technical courses. Technical electives may be chosen with the approval of the advisor from advanced undergraduate or graduate courses in engineering, computer science, mathematics, physical sciences, or biological sciences. More information can be found at www.ece.gwu.edu.

Computer Science

The program combines software development, computer systems and architecture, algorithms, project design, science, and mathematics to provide a strong background in the foundations that underlie computer science. Students are prepared to design and implement software needed for Internet operations, computer graphics and animation, secure systems, and applications for small, large, and embedded systems. In consultation with the advisor, students choose a technical track and a non-technical track. The technical track provides depth in a particular area of computer science, and the non-technical track is intended to enable the student to stay current with our rapidly evolving field and to establish the relevance of their studies in our global and changing environment.

First Semester—UW 1020; CSci 1010, 1111; SEAS 1001; math requirement; humanities or social sciences elective.

Second Semester—CSci 1311, 1112; math requirement; science requirement; humanities or social sciences elective.

Third Semester—CSci 2312, 2461, 2113; science requirement; humanities or social sciences elective.

Fourth Semester—CSci 3410, 2441; computer science elective; science requirement; statistics requirement (CSci 3362 or ApSc 3115 or Stat 1051 or 1053).

Fifth Semester—CSci 3313, 3212, 3411; humanities or social sciences elective.

Sixth Semester—technical track elective; non-technical track elective; math or science elective; humanities or social sciences elective; unrestricted elective.

Seventh Semester—CSci 4243; technical track elective; non-technical track elective; humanities or social sciences elective; unrestricted elective.

Eighth Semester—CSci 4244; technical track elective; non-technical track elective; unrestricted electives (6 hours).

Mathematics requirements can be met by taking Math 122021 and 1232 or by taking Math 1231 and 1232. All students must take two math courses not counting Math 1220; students who take Math 1220 must take it as one of their unrestricted electives. Science requirements can be met by choosing from BiSc 111112, Chem 111112, and Phys 102122. The three science requirement courses must include a two-course sequence.

Some examples of technical tracks include computer security and information assurance, digital media, foundations and theory, biomedical computing, systems, software engineering and applications and research. Examples of non-technical tracks include business, project management, global engineering, pre-law, and environment and climate change. Students may define their own non-technical track in consultation with their advisor. More information on the tracks and track requirements can be found at www.cs.gwu.edu.

Medical Preparation Option in Computer Science—This option is for students interested in pursuing a computer science major with preparation for application to a medical school by combining additional natural science course work with computer science course requirements.

Electrical Engineering

Electrical engineers design the enabling technology for modern telecommunications networks, including the Internet, biomedical instrumentation, and electromagnetic applications. The program focuses on signal processing; communication theory and practice; voice, data, video and multimedia communication networks; very large scale integrated (VLSI) circuit design and applications; and control systems. Students can take electives in advanced topics, such as optical networks, broadband wireless networks, and technologies for the next generation of information systems.

First Semester—UW 1020; Chem 1111; Math 1231; SEAS 1001; ECE 1010; elective.

Second Semester—CSci 1121; ECE 1020; Math 1232; Phys 1021; two electives.

Third Semester—ApSc 2113; CSci 1132; ECE 2110; Math 2233; Phys 1022.

Fourth Semester—ApSc 2114; ECE 2115, 2210, 2140; elective.

Fifth Semester—ApSc 3115; ECE 3220, 3130, 3520, 3910, 3135.

Sixth Semester—ECE 3315, 3125, 3410, 3915; elective.

Seventh Semester—ECE 4320, 4140, 4920, 4710; two electives.

Eighth Semester—ECE 4925, 4610; Phil 2135; three electives.

The ten electives must include three 3-credit courses in the social sciences, two 3-credit courses in the humanities, and five 3-credit technical courses. Technical electives may be chosen with the approval of the advisor from advanced undergraduate or graduate courses in engineering, computer science, mathematics, physical sciences, or biological sciences.

The Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering also offers the Bachelor of Science major in electrical engineering with the options listed below. More information can be found at www.ece.gwu.edu.

Energy Option in Electrical Engineering—The energy option leads to a bachelor’s degree in electrical engineering and prepares the student to work in technical energy fields such as electric utility companies and in research into improved methods of generation, transmission, and distribution of electrical energy.

Medical Preparation Option in Electrical Engineering—The medical preparation option leads to a bachelor’s degree in electrical engineering and prepares the student for application to medical school. The student is also prepared to work in various health sciences fields, to conduct research toward development of electronic equipment to assist in diagnosing and treating disease, or to continue as a graduate student in engineering with exceptional qualifications for biomedical engineering.

Mechanical Engineering

Mechanical engineering encompasses a vast range of industrial activities. Mechanical engineers conceive, plan, design, and direct the manufacture, distribution, and operation of complex systems. Applications include aerospace, energy conversion, computer-aided design and manufacturing, power and propulsion systems, robotics, and control systems.

First Semester—UW 1020; SEAS 1001; MAE 1001; Math 1231; Chem 1111; humanities or social sciences elective.

Second Semester—CSci 1121; MAE 1004; Math 1232, 2184; Phys 1021.

Third Semester—ApSc 2057, 2113; Math 2233; Phys 1022; humanities or social sciences elective.

Fourth Semester—ApSc 2058; ECE 2110; MAE 2117, 2131; humanities or social sciences elective.

Fifth Semester—CE 2220; MAE 3126, 3166, 3167, 3190, 3192.

Sixth Semester—ApSc 3115; MAE 3120, 3134, 3187, 3191; humanities or social sciences elective.

Seventh Semester—MAE 4149, 4182, 4193; technical electives (6 hours); humanities or social sciences elective.

Eighth Semester—MAE 4152; technical electives (9 hours); humanities or social sciences elective.

Humanities and social sciences electives must include Phil 2135 Ethics in Business and the Professions. Technical electives are chosen from MAE courses in the 3000, 4000, and 6000 series, excluding MAE 3171, 4172, 6298, and 699899. All technical electives must be approved by the undergraduate advisor. On a case-by-case basis, technical electives may be chosen from other departments if approved by both the undergraduate advisor and the department chair.

The Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering also offers the Bachelor of Science major in mechanical engineering with the options listed below. More information on the options can be found at www.mae.seas.gwu.edu.

Aerospace Option in Mechanical Engineering—The aerospace engineering option leads to a bachelor’s degree in mechanical engineering while preparing the student to work in the aerospace industry or to pursue graduate study in aerospace engineering. It provides a strong foundation in aerodynamics, airplane performance, propulsion, aerospace structures, orbital mechanics, spacecraft dynamics, and aircraft and spacecraft design.

Biomechanical Engineering Option in Mechanical Engineering—The biomechanical engineering option leads to a bachelor’s degree in mechanical engineering while preparing the student to work in the biomedical industry or to pursue graduate study in biomedical engineering. It provides a strong foundation in human anatomy and physiology, biomechanics, biomaterials, and design of biomedical devices.

Medical Preparation Option in Mechanical Engineering—The medical preparation option leads to a bachelor’s degree in mechanical engineering and prepares the student for application to medical school. The student is also prepared to work in research and development or to pursue graduate study in the fields of biomechanics and biotechnology.

Patent Law Option in Mechanical Engineering—The patent law option in mechanical engineering leads to a bachelor’s degree in mechanical engineering while providing a strong foundation in fundamental principles of patent law and the influences of the U.S. patent system on modern engineering design. A student in this option obtains background that can lead to work as a technical specialist in a patent law firm or in the patent department of an industrial employer. The option also provides excellent preparation for pursuit of a subsequent J.D. that may focus on intellectual property law.

Robotics Option in Mechanical Engineering—The robotics engineering option leads to a bachelor’s degree in mechanical engineering while preparing the student to work in the robotics industry or to pursue graduate study in robotics engineering. It provides a strong foundation in robotic mechanisms design, analysis, and integration; kinematics, dynamics, and control of robots; mechatronics design; sensing, actuation, and measurement; microprocessors for robotic systems; robotic haptics; and topics on artificial intelligence.

Systems Engineering

The multidisciplinary field of systems engineering applies engineering techniques and mathematical methods to improve planning and decision making in organizational systems composed of people, machines, and procedures. By observing, understanding, modeling, and predicting the behavior of such systems, practitioners of systems engineering assist the decision-making process that seeks to design and operate the systems optimally. Systems engineering finds application in many areas, including communications, energy, environment, finance, health care, information technology, marketing, national defense, project management, software development, and transportation.

Each student must participate in an appropriate internship/co-op experience during the last two years of the program. This requirement may be satisfied by an approved full-time summer position after the second or third year or by one or two approved part-time positions requiring 15–20 hours per week during two of the final four semesters. A position obtained through the GW Co-op Office will usually be acceptable; the position may be either paid or unpaid.

The systems engineering program is designed to provide the student a broad and solid education in the basics of mathematical modeling, software and information systems, and the treatment of uncertainty. Analytical thinking is stressed in order to prepare the student for graduate education or productive professional employment. The program is planned to develop the student’s communication skills and awareness of the current professional world.

First Semester—UW 1020; CSci 1111; EMSE 1001; SEAS 1001; Math 1231; science elective.

Second Semester—CSci 1112; Econ 1011; Math 1232; science elective; humanities or social sciences elective.

Third Semester—ApSc 2113; Comm 1040, 1041, or 1042; CSci 2113; Math 2233; science elective.

Fourth Semester—ApSc 3115; CSci 2441; EMSE 2705, 2801; humanities or social sciences elective.

Fifth Semester—EMSE 3850, 3740, 3815, 4755; humanities or social sciences elective, technical elective.

Sixth Semester—EMSE 3770, 3820, 3855, 4410; technical elective; humanities or social sciences elective.

Seventh Semester—EMSE 3760, 4190, 4710; Stat 2118; technical elective.

Eighth Semester—EMSE 4190, 4191; Stat 2183; three technical electives.

Science requirements can be met by choosing from BiSc 111112, Chem 111112, and Phys 102122. The three science requirement courses must include a two-course sequence.

Technical Electives—Each systems engineering major will gain specific expertise in a chosen technical area by taking a six-course sequence leading to a minor or secondary field from another department of the University. Technical electives are selected with the approval of the student’s academic advisor. Areas frequently chosen are computer science, economics, finance, management, mathematics, naval science, statistics, and specific fields of engineering; consult the advisor for other approved areas and their requirements.

Medical Preparation Option in Systems Engineering—The medical preparation option leads to a bachelor’s degree in systems engineering and quantitatively prepares students for medical careers through a program that emphasizes decision modeling. Decision modeling is increasingly applicable to the medical field because of the growing use of computers and information systems in medicine and the interplay of diagnosis, treatment, and economics.

Bachelor of Arts Degree Programs

The School of Engineering and Applied Science offers a Bachelor of Arts degree, with majors in applied science and technology and in computer science. Each program provides a strong and level base for students who intend to make their careers in fields allied to science and technology or to computer science.

Applied Science and Technology

The Bachelor of Arts major in applied science and technology is a broad-based engineering-oriented program, with a breadth of liberal arts, for students who intend to make their careers in fields allied to science and technology and/or continue their education toward professional careers in law, medicine, business, teaching, or the media. It is designed to help students pursue their goals in a world that relies more and more upon science and technology.

First Semester—UW 1020, EMSE 1001, SEAS 1001, Chem 1111, Math 1231, humanities or social sciences elective.

Second Semester—CSci 1121 or 1111, Chem 1112, Math 1232, humanities or social sciences elective, arts elective.

Third Semester—CSci 1132 or 1112, Phys 1011 or 1021, literature elective, two unrestricted electives.

Fourth Semester—ApSc 3115, EMSE 4410, Phys 1012 or 1022, literature elective, unrestricted elective.

Fifth Semester—BiSc 1111, EMSE 3850, Comm 1040 or 1041 or 1042, MAE 1004, allied minor elective.

Sixth Semester—BiSc 1112, ISTM 4121, two allied minor electives, humanities or social sciences elective.

Seventh Semester—MAE 3192; EMSE 3740, 6005; allied minor elective, SEAS elective.

Eighth Semester—CE 4330, allied minor elective, humanities or social sciences elective, three unrestricted electives.

Electives—Electives in specified categories are chosen from lists of courses available from the advisor. Allied minor electives are selected, with the approval of the advisor, to form a coherent and meaningful program of 15 credit hours. Popular selections include biology, communication, computer science, design, economics, engineering, environmental studies, finance, international business, management, mathematics, medical preparation, psychology, statistics, and operations research.

Computer Science

The Bachelor of Arts major in computer science provides a broad-based liberal arts curriculum for students who wish to augment technical knowledge with humanities, social sciences, business, communication, or management skills. Foundation courses focus on mathematics, science, software design and programming, computer systems and architecture, and algorithm design. Additional breadth or depth is afforded by selection of technical track courses that build on the foundations to provide in-depth exposure to a specific field in computer science. The program is designed for those with interests in two or more disciplines; students complete a second major or two minors in another academic department.

First Semester—UW 1020, CSci 1010, 1111; SEAS 1001; math requirement; social and behavioral sciences elective.

Second Semester—CSci 1311, 1112; math requirement; science requirement; social and behavioral sciences elective.

Third Semester—CSci 2461, 2113; science requirement; statistics requirement (ApSc 3115 or Stat 1051 or 1053); humanities elective.

Fourth Semester—CSci 2441; science requirement; humanities elective; second major elective; unrestricted elective.

Fifth Semester—Computer science restricted elective; creative arts elective; second major electives (9 hours).

Sixth Semester—Technical track elective; humanities elective; foreign languages and culture elective; second major electives (6 hours).

Seventh Semester—Computer science restricted elective; technical track elective; foreign languages and culture elective; second major electives (6 hours).

Eighth Semester—Technical track elective; humanities elective; unrestricted elective; second major electives (6 hours).

Students in this program complete a second major or two minors in another department outside engineering. Course requirements include UW 1020, Math 122021 or 12311232; CSci 1010, 1111, 1311, 1112, 2461, 2113, 2441; two restricted electives chosen from CSci 3313, 3212, 3410, 3411, 4223; three courses from a technical track in computer science (see the department for requirements); general curriculum requirement courses chosen from specified lists available from the advisor and from the department website in social or behavioral sciences, humanities, foreign languages and cultures, and creative and performing arts. Students are expected to undertake a significant project by completing either CSci 424344 or a project or senior thesis in their second major.

The minimum number of credits required for the major in computer science is 120; the credit total depends on the second major or minors chosen by the student. Students interested in pursuing a computer science major with preparation for application to medical school can also choose the medical preparation option. Additional information about the Bachelor of Arts major in computer science is available at www.cs.gwu.edu/academics.

Special Programs

Combined Degree Programs

Combined degree programs available to SEAS students include the B.S. and M.S. in civil engineering, mechanical engineering, and systems engineering; the B.A. or B.S. and M.S. in computer science or in cybersecurity in computer science; the B.S. in biomedical engineering, computer engineering, or electrical engineering and M.S. in biomedical engineering, computer engineering, or electrical engineering; and the B.S. in computer engineering, computer science, electrical engineering, or systems engineering and M.S. in engineering management. Also available is the B.A. in applied science and technology or computer science in SEAS and M.Ed. in secondary education (with a specialization in computer science, science, or mathematics) in the Graduate School of Education and Human Development. Specific information is available from the departments concerned.

Integrated Engineering and Law Program

The integrated engineering and law program provides an opportunity for very highly qualified entering students to complete a B.S. or B.A. degree in a SEAS field and then a J.D. degree, by assuring admission to the GW Law School’s J.D. program for students who meet stated conditions. Detailed information on this program is available from the Office of Undergraduate Admissions.

Minors and Secondary Fields of Study

The SEAS Departments of Computer Science, Electrical and Computer Engineering, Engineering Management and Systems Engineering, and Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering offer minors that are available to SEAS undergraduates whose major is not offered by that department. Depending on the student’s major, additional credit hours beyond the minimum required for the major may be necessary to complete the minor. Consult the advisor and the departments concerned.

The School offers secondary fields of study in biomedical engineering, computer engineering, computer science, electrical engineering, engineering analysis, and operations research to students in other schools of the University. SEAS students are cautioned to consult their advisor and department chair before enrolling in a secondary field of study in another school of the University.

Concentration in General Business

The GW School of Business offers a concentration in general business for well-qualified SEAS undergraduates. Depending on the student’s major, additional credit hours beyond the minimum required for the major may be necessary in order to complete this concentration; students should consult their advisor before requesting to add the concentration to their program or beginning to fulfill its requirements.

Double Majors

Students who complete the requirements for two majors in SEAS may graduate with a double major, provided the two majors are in different departments. Consult advisors in the two departments and declare both majors on the appropriate form in the SEAS Office of Student Services, Advising, and Records.

SEAS students may also pursue a second major in Columbian College of Arts and Sciences or the Elliott School of International Affairs, and Columbian College and Elliott School students may pursue a second major in SEAS, provided that permission has been obtained from the appropriate administrative office of each of the two schools.

The degree is earned from the home school, and students must complete the major in their own school in order to graduate.

In all cases, double majors do not result in two degrees. See Double Majors and Double Degrees under University Regulations.

3:2 Dual-Degree Programs

The School of Engineering and Applied Science has developed 3:2 dual-degree programs in liberal arts and engineering with the following institutions: Bowie State University, Gallaudet University, Hood College, Bridgewater College, St. Thomas Aquinas College, and Trinity University. Students enroll initially at one of the above institutions and pursue a three-year course of studies covering social sciences, humanities, mathematics, physics, and chemistry. They then follow a two-year program at SEAS in any of the areas of engineering or computer science offered in the School’s regular four-year programs. Upon successful completion of the two-year program at GW, students are awarded two baccalaureates: a B.S. or B.A. from the first institution and a B.S. or B.A. from GW. For further information on the 3:2 dual-degree programs, contact the admissions offices of the institutions listed above.

 

The George Washington University

© 2013 University Bulletin
The George Washington University All rights reserved.

Information in this bulletin is generally accurate as of fall 2012. The University reserves the right to change courses, programs, fees, and the academic calendar, or to make other changes deemed necessary or desirable, giving advance notice of change when possible.