Skip Navigation

University Bulletin: Graduate Programs The George Washington University  

 
   
 

ENGLISH

Professors C.W. Sten, D. McAleavey, O.A. Seavey, A. Romines, J.A. Miller, M. Alcorn, J.J. Cohen, J.G. Harris, K. Moreland, S. Knapp, R.L. Combs, G. Wald, M. Frawley, R. McRuer (Chair), T.G. Wallace

Associate Professors G. Carter, M.S. Soltan, D. Moshenberg, J.M. Green-Lewis, P. Cook, P. Chu, J.C. James, K. Daiya, A. Huang, H. Dugan, A. López

Assistant Professors J. Hsy, H.G. Carrillo, D. DeWispelare

Master of Arts in the field of English with optional concentrations in English or American literature- Prerequisite: a Bachelor of Arts degree with an undergraduate major in English or American literature, or 24 credit hours in English or American literature above the sophomore level.

Required: the general requirements stated under Columbian College of Arts and Sciences, including (1) 30 credit hours of course work planned in consultation with the department advisor; and (2) a master's portfolio submitted at the end of course work. Students have the option of writing a thesis (6 credit hours) on an approved topic, directed by a member of the department's graduate faculty. Students must maintain a grade-point average of at least 3.25.

Doctor of Philosophy in the field of English with optional concentrations in English or American literature- Prerequisite: a Bachelor of Arts degree with an undergraduate major in English or American literature, or 24 credit hours in English or American literature above the sophomore level.

Required: the general requirements stated under Columbian College of Arts and Sciences, including satisfactory completion of (1) course work planned in consultation with the department advisor; (2) a comprehension exam in a language approved by the department; (3) a qualifying examination passed at the beginning of the student's second year and a field examination passed by the end of the student's course work, topics and reading lists for which are designed in consultation with two graduate faculty advisors; (4) a dissertation proposal after the field exam; and (5) a dissertation on an approved topic, directed by a member of the department's graduate faculty and completed by the end of the fifth year of study. Each student plans a program of studies in consultation with the department advisor and a committee of the graduate faculty. Students must maintain a grade-point average of at least 3.5.

Note: All graduate English courses, except Engl 6100, may be repeated for credit with permission of the director of graduate studies.

6100 Introduction to Literary Theory (3) McRuer, Alcorn, Harris, López
  An overview of methodologies for examining texts as linguistic and cultural productions. Methodologies explored may include structuralism, formalism, deconstruction, cultural materialism, postcolonial theory, feminism, gender studies, and queer theory.
6120 Advanced Literary Theory (3) McRuer, Alcorn, Harris, López
  The course focuses on a major figure or topic in theory (e.g., Foucault, Lacan, Barthes, Kristeva, Bakhtin, post-Marxist theory, language and power, the canon). May be repeated for credit.
6130 Selected Topics in Criticism (3) Wald, McRuer, Harris
  Topics may include cultural studies, film, gay/lesbian studies, others.
6220 Topics in Medieval and Early Modern Studies (3) Cohen, Harris, Dugan, Hsy, Huang
  Topics may include gender and body; postcolonial approaches to the period; surveys of poetry and/or prose with a special thematic coherence. (Fall)
6240 Literature of the British Archipelago (3) Cohen, Harris, Dugan, Hsy
  The literary and historical texts of early modern and medieval Britain within a pan-insular framework: England in conflict and coexistence with Ireland, Wales, Scotland. (Fall)
6250 Transnational England (3) Cohen, Harris, Dugan, Hsy
  The early literature of England within a global framework: England, Spain, France, Italy, Turkey, the Levant, the Americas, Africa, India, the Caribbean. (Spring).
6260 Seminar in Medieval and Early Modern Studies (3) Cohen, Harris, Dugan, Hsy, Huang
  Trends and cutting-edge research in medieval and early modern studies. (Spring)
6350-53 Nineteenth Century (3-3-3-3) Green-Lewis, Moreland, Romines, Seavey, Sten, Wallace, James, Frawley, DeWispelare
  Topics in British and American nineteenth-century writing and culture, exploring national traditions and international movements and issues, such as Romanticism, Realism, and others.
6450-53 Twentieth Century (3-3-3-3) Chu, Green-Lewis, Miller, Moreland, Romines, Wald, James, López, Soltan
  Topics in twentieth-century British and American writing and culture, exploring national traditions and international movements and issues, such as literary modernism, anti-modernist and post-modernist currents, others.
6510 Writing Race and Nation (3) Chu, Miller, Wald, Cohen, James, Dugan, López, Hsy, Harris, Wallace
  Literary culture as a basis for exploration of intersections of origins and evolution of racial and ethnic identities and national myths and political objectives.
6520 Ethnicity and Identity (3) Chu, Cohen, López, Harris, Hsy
  Literary culture is used to explore how individuals, communities, and societies construct self-awareness and knowledge about others for cultural exchange.
6530 Conceptualizing Genders (3) Cohen, McRuer, Wald, Wallace, Dugan
  Structures of sex and gender difference considered historically and theoretically, including masculinity/femininity, sexualities, and their textual representations.
6540 Women and Writing (3) Romines, Wald, Wallace
  Selected topics in the traditions, theory, and texts of women’s literary production and culture. Same as WStu 6251.
6550–51 Studies in Genre (3–3) Sten, Daiya, Wallace
  Questions of genre, considered theoretically and practically. Content varies.
6560 Postcolonialism (3) Daiya, López, Wallace, Chu
  Postcolonial theory and texts by representative writers.
6620 Medicine and Society (3) Alcorn and Staff
  The interaction of medicine and society in ways that touch on philosophy, economics, sociology, and public policy, but that cannot be fully understood in terms of any single perspective. Society’s effect on medicine and medicine’s effect on society.
6630 Literature and Medicine (3) Alcorn
  Methods of critical theory applied to issues concerning the practice of medicine. The polar constructs of illness and health, life and death, and life’s worth or its waste.
6720 Independent Research (3) Staff
  Written permission of instructor required. May be repeated for credit to a maximum of 9 hours.
6740 Mastering the Canon (3) Staff
  Independent reading under a faculty member.
6998-99 Thesis Research (3-3) Staff
6810-11 Folger Institute Seminars (3-3) Staff
  Topics will be announced in the Schedule of Classes.May be repeated for credit provided the topic differs. Consult the graduate advisor before registration.
8998 Advanced Reading and Research (arr.) Staff
  Limited to students preparing for the Doctor of Philosophy general examination. May be repeated for credit.
8999 Dissertation Research (arr.) Staff
  Limited to Doctor of Philosophy candidates. May be repeated for credit.
 

The George Washington University

© 2013 University Bulletin
The George Washington University All rights reserved.

Information in this bulletin is generally accurate as of fall 2012. The University reserves the right to change courses, programs, fees, and the academic calendar, or to make other changes deemed necessary or desirable, giving advance notice of change when possible.