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University Bulletin: Graduate Programs The George Washington University  

 
   
 

CHEMISTRY

Professors M. King (Chair), J.H. Miller, A. Vertes, S. Licht, J.A. Tossell (Research), C.L. Cahill

Associate Professors M.J. Wagner, H.H. Teng, V. Sadtchenko, M.A. Massiah, M.G. Zysmilich

Assistant Professors C.S. Dowd, S. Gillmor, A.M. Voutchkova, H. Chen, S.R. Daly, L.M. McClary

Master of Science in the field of chemistry- Prerequisite: a bachelor's degree with a major in chemistry from this University, or an equivalent degree.

Required: the general requirements stated under Columbian College of Arts and Sciences. Course work must include a minimum of five graduate-level courses; at least four of the courses must be core courses as defined in the department's Guide for Graduate Students; at least three must be offered by the Chemistry Department. At least two graduate-level courses must be taken outside the subdiscipline of the student and in at least two other subdisciplines/disciplines. Candidates are required to pass a Master's Comprehensive Examination as described in the department's Guide for Graduate Students.

Thesis option- 30 credit hours of approved courses are required, including Chem 6998-99, Thesis Research, which may be in analytical, inorganic, organic, or physical chemistry.

Nonthesis option- 36 credit hours of approved courses are required, including Chem 6395. Up to 9 credit hours in other departments related to the student's area of interest (e.g., Forensic Sciences) may be included in the program, subject to the approval of the Department of Chemistry. Students who are or will be employed in organizations dealing with science and technology policy programs may select from specified courses offered by Information Systems and Technology Management, Political Science, Public Policy and Public Administration, and the Elliott School of International Affairs.

Doctor of Philosophy in the field of chemistry- Required: the general requirements stated under Columbian College of Arts and Sciences. Students develop their program of studies in consultation with their doctoral committee, subject to the approval of the department's Graduate Affairs Committee. The program of studies must include course work in a minimum of five graduate-level courses; at least four of the courses must be core courses as defined in the department's Guide for Graduate Students; at least three must be offered by the Chemistry Department. These course requirements cannot be fulfilled by achievement on placement exams. At least two graduate-level courses must be taken outside the subdiscipline of the student and in at least two other subdisciplines/disciplines. Equivalent courses offered by another university may be substituted at the discretion of the Graduate Affairs Committee. Students must pass a cumulative examination system and an oral defense of the doctoral research plan.

Research fields: analytical chemistry- analytical spectroscopy, biomedical analysis, chemical imaging, chemical instrumentation, electrochemical analysis, electrosprays, elemental and isotope analysis, laser-material interactions, mass spectrometry, nanophotonic structures, nmr spectroscopy, proteomics and metabolomics, single cell analysis; biochemistry- biological sensing via nanoparticles, biomaterials, biomolecular analysis, biophysical topics, enzymology, lipids chemistry, proteomics and metabolomics, enzyme expression and inhibition; structural biology, inorganic (materials) chemistry- battery chemistry, coordination chemistry, f-element chemistry, green chemistry, hydrothermal chemistry, mineral surface geochemistry, nanoscale and nanostructured materials, organometallic chemistry, small-molecule crystallography, solid-state materials; organic chemistry- biomaterials and lipids, computational docking and ligand design, green chemistry, heterocyclic chemistry, molecules of biological interest, synthesis; physical chemistry- CO2 removal, combustion chemistry, elemental and molecular spectroscopies, fuel cells, laser analytics, renewable energy conversion, solar chemical syntheses, surface chemistry, theoretical chemistry, thermochemical energy cycles.

Ph.D. students in chemistry may substitute up to 12 hours of Dissertation Research in the form of course work jointly approved by the Chemistry Department and the Forensic Sciences Department, the Environmental Resource Policy Program, or the International Science and Technology Policy program. The 12 hours may be selected from specified courses offered by Forensic Sciences, Information Systems and Technology Management, Political Science, Public Policy and Public Administration, and the Elliott School of International Affairs.

Note: All entering students in graduate chemistry programs are required to take the American Chemical Society Graduate Level Placement Examinations, given by the Department of Chemistry, prior to matriculation. The four placement examinations (in the disciplines of analytical, organic, inorganic, and physical chemistry) are designed to cover the subject matter in the disciplines generally taught in undergraduate programs preparatory for graduate work in chemistry, and the results are used by the department to advise the individual student in planning a program of courses appropriate to the student's background. All graduate students are required to participate in the seminar and colloquium programs. Upon consultation with course instructors, specific course prerequisites may be waived.

With permission, a limited number of upper-level undergraduate courses in the department may be taken for graduate credit; additional course work is required. See the Undergraduate Programs Bulletin for course listings.

6221 Spectrochemical Analysis (3) Staff
  Theory and application of recent spectrometric methods of analysis, including advances in optimization techniques, optical instrumentation, atomic spectrometry, laser-based analytical techniques, X-ray methods, and surface analysis techniques. Prerequisite: Chem 4122. (Fall)
6222 Biomedical Mass Spectrometry (3) Vertes
  Principles, instrumentation, methods, and applications of mass spectrometry; selected state-of-the-art methods demonstrate basic principles to show how new methods of analysis are developed; typical applications highlight solutions of biomedical problems, including proteomics and metabolomics. Prerequisite: Chem 4122.
6235-36 Advanced Inorganic Chemistry (3-3) Cahill and Staff
  Application of modern chemical theories to inorganic substances and reactions; detailed study, developed from the periodic table, of the chemistry of the more common elements; electronic spectra and reaction mechanisms of complexes; organometallic chemistry; homogeneous and heterogeneous catalysis; bioinorganic chemistry. Prerequisite: Chem 3172, 4134.
6238 Inorganic Materials Chemistry (3) Wagner
  Synthesis, structure, and properties of materials such as ceramics, superconductors, ionic conductors, nanomaterials, and magnetic, optical, and electronic materials. Emphasis on traditional and low-temperature routes. Prerequisite: Chem 3171-72. (Fall, even years)
6251-52 Advanced Organic Chemistry (3-3) Dowd and Staff
  Synthesis, reactions, and properties of organic compounds; fundamental theories of organic chemistry, emphasis on reaction mechanisms. Prerequisite to Chem 6251: Chem 2152. Prerequisite to Chem 6252: Chem 6251. (Academic year)
6257 Physical-Organic Chemistry (3) Staff
  The transition state theory of chemical kinetics, applications to reaction mechanisms; kinetic isotope effects, linear-free energy relationships, concentrated and "super" acids, Woodward-Hoffman rules, free radical reactions. Prerequisite: Chem 6251 or permission of instructor.  (Spring, odd years)
6259 Polymer Chemistry (3) Staff
  A study of the preparation, properties, and structure of macromolecules. Prerequisite: Chem 2152 and 3170 or 3171 or permission of instructor. (Fall, odd years)
6273 Chemical Thermodynamics (3) Miller, Sadtchenko
  Application of thermodynamics to chemical problems. Emphasis on statistical calculation of thermodynamic properties. Prerequisite: Chem 3172 or 6372. (Spring)
6277 Chemical Bonding (3) Chen
  Quantum mechanics, approximate methods, electron spin, Pauli principle, atomic and molecular structure. Prerequisite: Chem 3172 or 6372. (Fall)
6278 Molecular Spectroscopy (3) Miller and Staff
  Applications of quantum mechanics and group theory to the interpretation of electronic, vibrational, rotational, and magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Prerequisite: Chem 6277. (Spring, odd years)
6320 Selected Topics in Analytical Chemistry (1 to 3) Staff
  Advanced topics offered in a modular format to allow an in-depth examination of a self-selected field of analytical chemistry. One to three topics may be chosen for a given semester. May be repeated for credit.
6330 Selected Topics in Inorganic Chemistry (1 to 3) Staff
  Advanced topics offered in a modular format to allow an in-depth examination of a self-selected field of inorganic chemistry. One to three topics may be chosen for a given semester. May be repeated for credit.
6350 Selected Topics in Organic Chemistry (1 to 3) Staff
  Advanced topics offered in a modular format to allow an in-depth examination of a self-selected field in organic chemistry. One to three topics may be chosen for a given semester. May be repeated for credit.
6358 Synthesis and Structure Determination in Organic Chemistry (3) Staff
  The design of syntheses for complex organic molecules; survey of modern synthetic methods, including asymmetric induction; spectroscopic methods of structure determination. Prerequisite: Chem 6251 or permission of instructor. (Fall, even years)
6370 Selected Topics in Physical Chemistry (1 to 3) Staff
  Advanced topics offered in a modular format to allow an in-depth examination of a self-selected field of physical chemistry. One to three topics may be chosen for a given semester. May be repeated for credit.
6371-72 Physical Chemistry (1 to 3 each) Wagner, Miller, Chen
  Same as Chem 3171-72. Admission only by departmental permission. Credit assigned upon satisfactory completion of Chem 6273. (Academic year)
6390 Selected Topics (1 to 3) Staff
  Advanced topics offered in a modular format to allow an in-depth examination of a self-selected field in chemistry. One to three topics may be chosen for a given semester. May be repeated for credit.
6395 Research (arr.) Staff
  Limited to master's degree candidates. Survey of a topic approved by departmental staff and resulting in a written report and presentation of a seminar. Open to qualified students with advanced training. May be repeated for credit.
6998-99 Thesis Research (3-3) Staff
8998 Advanced Reading and Research (arr.) Staff
  Limited to students preparing for the Doctor of Philosophy general examination. May be repeated for credit.
8999 Dissertation Research (arr.) Staff
  Limited to Doctor of Philosophy candidates. May be repeated for credit.
 

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© 2013 University Bulletin
The George Washington University All rights reserved.

Information in this bulletin is generally accurate as of fall 2012. The University reserves the right to change courses, programs, fees, and the academic calendar, or to make other changes deemed necessary or desirable, giving advance notice of change when possible.