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University Bulletin: Graduate Programs The George Washington University  

 
   
 

BIOMEDICAL SCIENCES

Committee on Biomedical Sciences

L. Werling (Director), A. Chiaramello, R.P. Donaldson, V. Gallo, E. Hoffman, V. Hu, D. Mendelowitz, N. Lee, D. Leitenberg, D. Perry, M. Rose

The interdisciplinary doctoral programs in the biomedical sciences are organized within the Institute for Biomedical Sciences. The first full year of study toward the Ph.D. programs in the fields of biochemistry and systems biology, microbiology and immunology, and molecular medicine is offered through the Institute. All programs are taken on a full-time basis. Faculty are drawn from GW's Columbian College of Arts and Sciences and School of Medicine and Health Sciences, including scientists from the Children's Research Institute of Children's National Medical Center.

The biomedical sciences core curriculum consists of BmSc 8210, 8212, and 8216-8218; and 3 credit hours of BmSc 8215.

Students are admitted directly into the Institute for Biomedical Sciences through Columbian College of Arts and Sciences. At the end of the first year of study, each student selects one of the three Ph.D. fields and completes remaining degree requirements in the appropriate program- biochemistry and systems biology, microbiology and immunology, and molecular medicine.

Doctor of Philosophy in the field of biochemistry and systems biology - Prerequisite: A bachelor's degree in biological sciences, chemistry, or a related field.

Required: the general requirements stated under Columbian College of Arts and Sciences. Coursework must include the biomedical sciences core curriculum and BmSc 8230, 8234. Recommended electives include BmSc 8231, 8233; MMed 8280; Phar 6205; Bioc 6234; Micr 6230.

Research fields: Molecular basis of inherited muscle and CNS disease utilizing DNA gene chip technology; genomic, epigenetic, metabolomic, and bioinformatic analyses; biomarkers; mechanistic pathways, genomics, proteomics, clinical medicine; autoimmune and inflammatory responses in disease; co-regulator biology; cancer.

Doctor of Philosophy in the field of microbiology and immunology -Prerequisite: A bachelor's degree in biological sciences, chemistry, or a related field.

Required: the general requirements stated under Columbian College of Arts and Sciences. Course work must include the biomedical sciences core curriculum, Micr 8210, an approved statistics course, and either Micr 6201 or 8230. Recommended electives include Bioc 6234, 6250; Micr 6233; MMed 8221, 8222.

Research fields: T-cell development, immune regulation, tumor immunology, host-pathogen interaction, asthma, allergy, molecular virology, parasitology.

Doctor of Philosophy in the field of molecular medicine - Prerequisite: A bachelor's degree in chemistry, biological sciences, or an approved related field.

Required: the general requirements stated under Columbian College of Arts and Sciences. Course work must include the biomedical sciences core curriculum, with MMed 8214 and one of the following: Anat/Idis 6212, Phar 6205, or MMed 8221. Pertinent electives include MMed 8280, 8222, 8282, 8283; Bioc 6250; BiSc 6249, 6274, 6275; Psyc 8268 or 8281.

Research fields: neuroscience - neural transplantation, molecular mechanisms of action of drugs of abuse, neurotransmitter systems, developmental neurobiology, psychobiology of learning and memory, function of ion channels and receptors; oncology - cancer chemotherapy and mechanisms of resistance, UV light, tumor cell biology and metabolism, gene regulation, oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes, growth factors, chemotherapy and mechanisms of resistance, immunotherapy, development of immunological and molecular markers for diagnosis and detection, tumor immunology, epidemiology and prevention, cancer and AIDS, mechanisms of metastasis, transgenic models of cancer, genomics and proteomics; pharmacology - molecular carcinogenesis, genetic toxicology, cancer chemotherapy, neuropharmacology, biochemical and molecular pharmacology and toxicology.

Courses

 

Biomedical Sciences

8210 Genes to Proteins (4)
  Proteins structure and function, introduction to metabolic processes. Structure and function of nucleic acids, organization of the genome, and regulation of protein synthesis and processing. Registration with permission of instructor.
8212 Developmental Cell Biology and Systems Physiology (4)
  Structure and functions of cells and tissues, techniques used for the analysis of cell function (image analysis, microscopy). Physiological bases of organ systems and origins of disease. Registration with permission of instructor.
8215 Lab Rotations (1)
  For Ph.D. students enrolled in the Institute for Biomedical Sciences. Laboratory training in advanced techniques in biomedical sciences research practices. May be repeated for credit.
8216-18 Career Skills for the Biomedical Sciences (1-1-1)
  Scientific writing, presentation skills, and seminar planning. Developing roles in the field: research in varying settings, policy and program planning, grants administration, and the biotechnology issues within intellectual property law. Ethical issues related to the conduct of research, animal use, and human subject participation. The design of a successful grant proposal.
8230 Molecular Basis of Human Disease (3)
  Principles of systems biology in the context of specific diseases. Problem solving at multiple levels of biology, integrating knowledge of DNA, RNA, proteins, cell biology, and tissue physiology. Prerequisite: BmSc 8210, 8212.
8231 Advanced Proteomics Methods and Applications (2)
  Proteomics approaches to specific questions about a biological system. Advanced methods and applications. Prerequisite: BmSc 8230.
8232 Integrative Approaches to Biomedicine (2)
  Integrated network approaches for accurate disease classification, diagnosis, and prognosis prediction; identification of novel therapeutic targets; determination of appropriate dosing. Prerequisite: BmSc 8230.
8233 Integrative Bioinformatics (2)
  Bioinformatics techniques for analysis of macromolecular sequences, structures, gene expression arrays, and proteomics. Systems biology approaches to research problems. Prerequisite: BmSc 8230.
8234 Seminar in Systems Biology (2)
  Prerequisite: permission of instructor.
8998 Advanced Reading and Research (arr.)
  Limited to students preparing for the Doctor of Philosophy general examination. May be repeated for credit.
8999 Dissertation Research (arr.)
  Limited to Doctor of Philosophy candidates. May be repeated for credit.
 

The George Washington University

© 2013 University Bulletin
The George Washington University All rights reserved.

Information in this bulletin is generally accurate as of fall 2012. The University reserves the right to change courses, programs, fees, and the academic calendar, or to make other changes deemed necessary or desirable, giving advance notice of change when possible.