REPUBLICAN   DEMOCRATIC REFORM NATURALLAW GREEN




Reform Party--
Pres. Nomination 2000




LIBERTARIAN CONSTITUTION .
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Ultra-Longshot Parties
David McReynolds/Mary Cal Hollis--(Socialist Party USA)          Photos
-selected at Socialist Party USA 1999 National Convention Oct. 14-17, 1999 in Secaucus, NJ.
Earl F. Dodge/Dean Watkins--(Prohibition Party)
-selected at 1999 Prohibition Party National Convention June 29-30, 1999 in Bird in Hand, PA.
Monica Moorhead/Gloria La Riva--(Workers World Party)         Photos
-named at the Workers World Party National Conference "Learning Marxism for today's struggles"
Nov. 6-7, 1999 in New York, NY.
James Harris/Margaret Trowe--(Socialist Workers Party)
-launched campaign June 25, 2000 at Columbia University.

One of the biggest hurdles third party and independent presidential candidates face is qualifying for the ballot in the 50 states.  Each state has its own set of rules, and these rules often tend to favor the Democratic and Republican candidates. Ballot Access News

"Hey! How about us?"  Ultra-Longshot Candidates 
Anyone can run for President, provided he or she meets the criteria set out in Article II of the Constitution.  While an eclectic mix of more than 100 people filed with the Federal Election Commission to run for president, most of these individuals have dropped out of the race. (A favored strategy of some ultra-longshot candidates is to mount a campaign in the New Hampshire primary, where it is relatively easy to get on the ballot).  Nonetheless heading into the general election, one may occasionaly meet the odd individual handing out a business card or flyer proclaiming that he or she is a "Write-In Candidate for President."  There are also a number of very small parties that run candidates.  The advent of the Web makes it easier for longshot candidates to get their messages to voters across the country.  In practical terms, however, most of the longshots are unknowns, who have not held elective office and who have very limited resources to devote to their campaigns.  They do not have the wherewithal to get their names on the ballot or put together slates of electors. 

Project Vote Smart list | Politics1 | White House 2000

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