D.C. Transportation

Regardless of how you travel, once in the city you’ll find it easy to get around on foot or by using the Metro system of buses and underground rail. 

By Air

The Washington region is served by three major airports:

Reagan Washington National Airport in suburban Virginia is closest and most convenient to the University. From the airport, you can hop on a Metrorail train or take a taxi directly to the Foggy Bottom Campus.

Dulles International Airport is more distant in the Virginia suburbs. You may want to rent a car, take a taxi or use the Washington Flyer shuttles to get into the city. There is not yet direct rail transport from Dulles to Washington, D.C.

Baltimore-Washington International Airport (BWI), in Maryland, is the most distant area airport from the campus. From BWI, you can rent a car or take the Super Shuttle or Amtrak train into Washington, D.C.

By Rail

The Washington region is served by Amtrak. If traveling by rail, you will arrive at Union Station, not far from the Capitol.  MARC trains (Maryland Transit Administration) and VRE trains (Virginia Railway Express) serve commuters from the Maryland and Virginia suburbs. They share the Union Station hub with Amtrak. Inside Union Station, you can board Metrorail for a short subway ride to the heart of the Foggy Bottom Campus. 

By Metro (Subway)

The Washington Metropolitan Area Transit Authority provides an efficient subway system for navigating the city. Extensive Metrobus routes complement it. An extensive network of underground and aboveground trains (Metrorail) serves most of the city and Maryland and Virginia suburbs, as well as Reagan Washington National Airport. Planned future extensions include service to Dulles International Airport.

The Foggy Bottom GWU Metro stop, located on the Blue, Orange and Silver lines, is on our Foggy Bottom Campus at 21st and I Streets, NW.

By Car

Washington D.C., is located inside the famous Capital Beltway (I-495), accessible from north and south on Interstate 95, and from the west on I-66. Traveling by car around the Washington area can be challenging, particularly for first-time visitors.

By Taxi

A fleet of thousands of licensed, metered taxis serves Washington, D.C., close-in suburbs and the airports.

By Zip Car

Need a car on occasion? Sign up for ZipCar, a convenient, by-the-hour, self-service car rental program. ZipCars are found on campus and throughout the district. All GW students over the age of 18 can join Zipcar at a discounted rate. Fuel, insurance and Zipcar-only parking are included in the rental rates.

By Bike

Washington, D.C., is on the leading edge of bike travel. More than 700 bike racks have been installed around the city since 2000. Countless miles of bike paths go along the Potomac River, through historic neighborhoods, past Civil War sites, around town and into Virginia and Maryland. You can even take your bike on the Metro.

The District of Columbia also has a self-service, public bike-rental program. Capital Bikeshare is an alternative transportation network designed to enhance the city's public transportation system. Capital Bikeshare are parked at designated points throughout the city. Like ZipCar, you can register online and unlock the key to your temporary wheels.

University Offices & Staff

The George Washington University is the largest institution of higher education in the nation’s capital. More than 6,000 faculty members, administrators and support personnel keep the University’s wheels turning.

An essential part of the GW community, they handle student admissions and financial aid, ensure the best possible housing and dining experiences, manage GW’s facilities and resources, are responsible for the health and safety of the University community and strive to create an environment that supports top-quality education.

Department Chairs

The chair of a department serves as the communications channel for all regular business between the faculty of the department and the university’s administration. Department chairs are appointed by the Provost and Executive Vice President for Academic Affairs, acting on nominations from the department that are recommended by the dean of the school.

Exceptions are appointments for chairs in departments of the School of Medicine and Health Sciences and Milken Institute School of Public Health, which are forwarded to the Provost and Executive Vice President for Academic Affairs, acting on nominations from the school’s dean following a national search or completion of the process outlined in the school's by-laws.

The chair represents the department in matters that are referred to the dean for decision or approval. Increased emphasis on academic planning within the University has added significantly to the chairs’ responsibilities, which include:

  • Responsible for overall quality of the department’s instructional program and research activities
  • Responsible for the administration of department resources
  • Ensure that classes are met and conducted responsibly
  • Ensure that departmental advising is accurately and effectively performed
  • Plays a key role in the preparation and administration of annual budgets
  • Understanding and implementing – effectively, consistently and equitably – all personnel policies, in association with faculty colleagues
  • Facilitates the ongoing professional development of faculty colleagues

Deans

The dean of each school serves as its chief administrative officer and is responsible to the president through the provost and executive vice president for academic affairs. Deans serve at the pleasure of the president, provided they retain the confidence of their faculty.

The deans meet regularly as the Council of Deans under the leadership of the provost and executive vice president for academic affairs. The council plays a major role in the formulation and implementation of the university’s academic goals and educational policies.

Deans have specific roles and responsibilities for their academic units:

  • Responsible for the supervision and development of all resources of the school, including instructional and research programs, faculty and teaching staff, physical facilities and financial resources
  • Presides at faculty meetings of the school
  • With the faculty, develops school policies following university guidelines
  • Recommends appointments, promotions and tenure, based on recommendations of the school’s departments or faculty
  • Prepares annual and long-term budgets with assistance of the faculty
  • Controls expenditures of the school in consultation with the vice president for academic affairs
  • May request and defend the need for further allocations of funds
  • Responsible for leadership in attracting external funds to the school for development of facilities, programs and staff
     

Linda Livingstone, dean, GW School of Business
Ben Vinson III, dean, Columbian College of Arts and Sciences
Michael E. Brown, dean, Elliott School of International Affairs
David S. Dolling, dean, School of Engineering and Applied Science
Ali Eskandarian, dean, College of Professional Studies
Michael J. Feuer, dean, Graduate School of Education and Human Development
Pamela Jeffries, dean, GW School of Nursing
Blake D. Morant, dean, GW Law School
Lynn R. Goldman, dean, Milken Institute School of Public Health
Jeffrey Akman, vice president for health affairs and dean, School of Medicine and Health Sciences

Want to talk like a GW student?

Jargon is part of the fun of belonging to the GW community.  Students, faculty, staff, neighbors and even parents, both new and seasoned, bandy about words and phrases strongly identified with our University.

Vice Presidents

Vice presidents at the George Washington University collectively oversee university's vast infrastructure, providing senior leadership and strategic vision across all aspects of GW life. Vice presidents are appointed by and report directly to the president.

Provost and Executive Vice President for Academic Affairs Steven Lerman

Steven Lerman joined the George Washington University as provost and executive vice president of academic affairs in 2010. As the university’s chief academic officer, he oversees the deans of GW’s 10 colleges and schools to foster academic programs that are both rigorous and relevant, with a particular emphasis on cross-disciplinary scholarship. Dr. Lerman is also responsible for such areas as student affairs, libraries, athletics, and diversity and inclusion.

Dr. Lerman holds the A. James Clark Chair in Civil and Environmental Engineering in the School of Engineering and Applied Science and is a three-time alumnus of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

Executive Vice President and Treasurer Louis H. Katz

Louis H. Katz

Louis H. Katz is the university's chief financial officer. He carries primary responsibility for the management of GW's financial, physical and information systems resources. He oversees strategic, operating and capital planning and budgeting. And he advises the president and the board of trustees on financial and strategic matters affecting the development and operations of the university.

Katz joined GW in 1990 as vice president and treasurer. He was promoted to executive vice president and treasurer in 2003. A long-time manager of academic institutions with medical centers, he previously spent eight years as vice president for administration and treasurer at Tulane University.

Senior Vice President and General Counsel Beth Nolan

Beth Nolan

Beth Nolan is the chief legal officer for the university. She directs all legal services for GW, providing legal counsel, preventive legal guidance and related services in support of the university's teaching and research mission.

Nolan joined GW as senior vice president and general counsel in December 2007. A former GW law professor, she returned to the university after serving as a partner in Crowell & Moring LLP in Washington, D.C. From 1999 to 2001, she was counsel to President Bill Clinton, making her the first woman to serve as counsel to the president of the United States.

 

Vice President for External Relations Lorraine Voles

Lorraine Voles

Lorraine Voles, BA '81, joined GW in February 2009 as vice president for external relations, a new position that brings communications and government relations into one division. Voles guides GW's government and community relations efforts and communicates the university's goals and accomplishments to a wide variety of constituents, both inside and outside GW.

A professional in the corporate and political communications fields, Voles most recently served as senior vice president of communications and marketing services for Fannie Mae. Prior to that, she was deputy press secretary for former President Bill Clinton, director of communications and chief spokeswoman for former Vice President Al Gore, director of communications for former U.S. Sen. Hillary Clinton and press secretary for U.S. Sen. Tom Harkin.

Vice President for Research Leo M. Chalupa

Leo M. Chalupa

Leo M. Chalupa became the university's first vice president of research on April 1, 2009. He serves as GW's chief research officer, charged with overseeing the strategic and operational development of our rapidly growing research enterprise.

An accomplished scientist and administrator, Dr. Chalupa comes to GW following a 34-year career at the University of California, Davis, most recently serving as the chair of neurobiology, physiology and behavior in the College of Biological Sciences. A distinguished professor of neurobiology and ophthalmology at UC Davis, he founded the university's Center for Neuroscience in 1992, as well as the Mind and Brain Center, the Brain Imaging Center and the Center for Visual Sciences.

Vice President for Development and Alumni Relations Aristide J. Collins Jr

Aristide Collins Jr.

Aristide J. Collins Jr. is vice president for Development and Alumni Relations at the George Washington University. Collins is charged with overseeing the university’s comprehensive philanthropic campaign and also has a faculty appointment as a lecturer in Higher Education Administration.

Formerly, Mr. Collins served as vice president and secretary of GW; vice president for institutional advancement and university relations at Clark Atlanta University; vice president for advancement and a faculty member at Pacific Oaks College and Children's School in Pasadena, California; director of development for university projects at the George Washington University. He also held leadership positions over ten years at California State University at Long Beach. Mr. Collins is designated a Certified Specialist in Planned Giving by the American Institute for Philanthropic Studies. He holds a master's degree in public administration from California State University, Long Beach, and a bachelor's degree in political science and Special Certificate in Educational Management from California State University, Hayward. He has completed post-graduate studies in organizational leadership at Pepperdine University.

Vice President for Human Resources Sabrina Ellis

Sabrina Ellis

Sabrina Ellis serves as vice president for human resources. Ms. Ellis plays an important operational, management, and strategic role, ensuring that the human resources (HR) function and its activities are professional and responsive. She leads and manages the central HR organization and provides professional guidance and direction to the HR professionals within GWs divisions.

Ms. Ellis brings to the position extensive experience in all aspects of human resources management, including managing human resources needs for academic institutions. Ms. Ellis joined the George Washington University from the City College of New York, CUNY, where she served as assistant vice president of human resources and chief human resources officer. Previously, she served as a human resources director at New York University and as a human resources analyst at Abbott Laboratories located in North Chicago, Ill.

Vice President for Health Affairs and Dean of the School of Medicine and Health Sciences Jeffrey Akman

Jeffrey Akman

Jeffrey S. Akman, MD, was appointed the Vice President for Health Affairs and Dean of the School of Medicine and Health Sciences (SMHS) in 2013. In his capacity as vice president for health affairs, he serves as a liaison between the university and its clinical partners, including the GW Medical Faculty Associates, the GW Hospital, and the Children's National Medical Center. As dean, he leads the eleventh oldest medical school in the United States.

Dr. Akman is a graduate of the SMHS MD program and also completed his psychiatry residency at GW. He has been a GW faculty member since 1985 and has served in decanal roles, including the associate dean for student and faculty development and policies. Just prior to becoming the interim vice president for health affairs, Dr. Akman served as the Leon M. Yochelson professor and chair of the GW Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences (2000-2010), where he continues to teach medical students and maintain a clinical practice. Dr. Akman is a member of D.C. Mayor Vincent Gray's Commission on HIV/AIDS. He is a Distinguished Fellow of the American Psychiatric Association and a member of the prestigious American College of Psychiatrists. Dr. Akman has a long history of community service and has served on numerous nonprofit boards of directors for organizations like the Whitman-Walker Clinic. He has received multiple awards related to teaching, community service, and humanism in medicine and is a member of Alpha Omega Alpha medical honor society.

 

 

The Unofficial Mascot

In 1996, GW’s then-President Stephen Joel Trachtenberg gave a gift to the Class of 2000--a bronze hippopotamus. Since it was installed at the corner of 21st and H streets, NW, the hippo has become an unofficial GW mascot.

GW hippo statue in front of Lisner Auditorium

Institutional Partnerships

The nation’s capital is a magnet for institutions that share many of The George Washington University’s aspirations for strengthening education, promoting social and economic opportunity and bringing cutting-edge research and outstanding expertise to bear on the challenges of our time—from healthcare to homeland security. GW creates formal and informal partnerships with these organizations to drive progress toward our mutual goals.

GW partners with 13 universities and two colleges in the Washington area. This consortium is dedicated to advancing higher education in and around the capital, enabling a combined 130,000 students to benefit from our collective resources. We also work closely with the D.C. Chamber of Commerce and collaborate with the Greater Washington Urban League, Greater Washington Board of Trade and other organizations to create strategies that enhance our community’s quality of life.

Within the Foggy Bottom neighborhood of our main campus, GW maintains relationships with the World Bank, International Red Cross, Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts and countless embassies, hotels, law firms, businesses and associations. Together we sponsor events, coordinate volunteerism and leverage our resources for common causes.

Corporations & Partners

From local nonprofits to large multinational institutions, GW is always looking for partners that complement and enhance our shared mission.  Fill out our partnership form to learn more about how our students, faculty, alumni and programmatic resources can support your mission—and how you can help drive GW’s success.

The Office of Industry/Corporate Research serves as the University's focal point to forge partnerships with industry and corporations to fund research and other special projects and initiatives at GW and to commercialize our innovative research with industry leaders.

Corporate Partnerships

Working with companies and entrepreneurs, the Office of Corporation Relations (Development) and the Office of Corporate/Industry Research (Research) help the private sector explore partnership opportunities across GW.

Foundation Relations Program

The Foundation Relations Program provides comprehensive services to support faculty, administrators and center directors in their work with foundations.

Institutional Partnerships

GW creates formal and informal partnerships with several local organizations to drive progress toward our mutual goals.
 


 

Student Publications

GW has a heritage of rich, lively student publications. Like most college and university students, those at GW are driven to communicate information, to share and debate ideas and the issues of the day, and to display their creativity.

The first student newspaper, the Columbian Call, was published from 1895 to 1902 (the university was named “Columbian University” at that time). After languishing for a few years, the concept of a student newspaper reemerged in 1904 at the instigation of university President Charles W. Needham with the publication of The Weekly Columbian, the first continuously published student newspaper. Needham realized that the student body could be unified and inspired by such a vehicle. When the university became The George Washington University in 1904, the newspaper was renamed The University Hatchet, a reference to legends surrounding the university’s namesake and, perhaps, a hint of a more aggressive editorial policy. The Hatchet lives on as the second oldest surviving newspaper in Washington, D.C.

Over the years, many student published magazines, journals and reviews have come and gone. Independence Magazine was launched in the 1980’s, but ceased publication in 1998. The GW Journal had a run of two years, from 2000-2002. Undoubtedly many new vehicles for student communications will appear and then fade in the intellectual and social life of GW.

Current student publications run the gamut from straight information to opinion to creative expression. They include:

The Hatchet

Founded in 1904 as The University Hatchet, but now known simply as The Hatchet, the paper is both editorially and financially independent. It reports on university activities, student life, GW athletics, Washington area happenings, and college life nationally. Throughout its existence, The Hatchet has continued to fulfill its purpose of uniting the student body and encouraging campus spirit. As noted, it is the second oldest newspaper in the nation’s capitol. It has a paid staff of 35 and a volunteer staff of 100, publishing two issues each week. Breaking news is published on the paper’s Web site. The Hatchet was recognized as the best non-daily college newspaper in the country for 2003-2004 by the Society of Professional Journalists, and has won the Pacemaker Award of the Associated College Press in 2005 and 2008. Five Pulitzer Prize winners are alumni of The Hatchet. It is a produced by Hatchet Publications, Inc., an independent non-profit corporation.

The Cherry Tree

The university’s first student yearbook, published in 1890, was called The Columbiad, from The Columbian University name. This was shortened to The C in 1904, then evolved into The Mall in 1908, reflecting GW’s Washington location. In 1908, a student suggested the name The Cherry Tree, making a connection to another aspect of a George Washington legend (see The Hatchet). This name remains in use today.

The Cherry Tree is distributed free to all GW seniors as a gift from the GW Alumni Association, and is distributed in the fall after graduation. Each edition is planned, designed, edited, illustrated, and produced by GW students, with job titles and responsibilities rotating annually. The Cherry Tree’s student publishers have as their mission the facilitation of a greater sense of a GW community, to build unity and cohesion among the university’s departments, and to build and foster memories of the academic achievements, social lives, and school spirit of GW’s graduates. Each edition features portraits of graduating seniors, along with a written and photographic record of notable achievements – academic, social, and athletic.

Wooden Teeth

Whimsically named for yet another George Washington legend, Wooden Teeth is GW’s premier visual arts and literary student publication, soliciting contributions from GW students, faculty, and staff of both written and visual works. Beginning life in the 1970’s as the Rock Creek Review, Wooden Teeth is now published bi-annually at the end of each spring and fall semester. The editors court controversial and cutting-edge contributions, seeking to push boundaries in literature and the arts, while not lapsing into sensationalism. The editors are highly selective, often rejecting up to 90 percent of submissions in order to guarantee a high level of quality. Wooden Teeth also sponsors monthly on-campus performances and readings of poetry, short stories and songs in order to foster creative and critical thinking about the arts in the GW community.

The G.W. Review

The G.W. Review, entirely student-run literary magazine, with national and international reach, is published annually. Each issue consists of 100 pages containing works of poetry, fiction, and art as well as interviews with local writers and artists. The Review holds an annual Senior Contest for contributions that also may be published. The G.W. Review’s mission is to provide students with the opportunity to learn editorial and design skills through participation in weekly meetings on fiction and poetry, as well as training students in the use of several design programs during the layout process. Working on The Review offers a unique hands-on experience in working in publishing beyond the university, and the opportunity to become involved and active in GW’s literary community. The G.W. Review also holds “Coffeehouses,” readings, in conjunction with Wooden Teeth and other organizations to promote interest and participation in GW's art community, and to offer students popular on-campus, alcohol-free events.