Dining

GW students will find a wide variety of interesting dining options on campus and within the city. The Colonial Cash Dining Program and the GWorld Card combine to deliver an exceptional college dining experience by offering students freedom of choice to make the dining and retail purchases that best suit their individual lifestyles.

Flexible spending with the GWorld Card allows students to maximize the value of their dining plans. 

GW’s dining plans eliminate concern about “paying for missed meals” as we’ve eliminated set meal periods so that students can eat when and where they like!

Students living in campus housing are required to participate in the dining plan established specifically for their class standing.

Students manage their dining expenses, as well as other personal expenses, through the Colonial Cash plan. Colonial Cash is a flexible, declining-balance spending program that can be used at more than 90 dining and retail establishments on campus and conveniently located within the surrounding city neighborhoods.

Additional information about GW’s Dining Plans is available at: www.living.gwu.edu

Required Dining Plans for Students Living in Campus Housing

Academic Year 2012-2013

Freshman (Fewer than 30 credit hours)

  • $3,400/academic year
    • $1,400 ($700/semester) Campus Dining Dollars*
    • $2,000 ($1,000/semester) Colonial Cash**

Sophomore (30-59 credit hours)

  • $2,500/academic year ($1,250/semester) Colonial Cash**

Junior (60-89 credit hours)

  • $2,500/academic year ($1,000/semester) Colonial Cash**

Senior (90+ credit hours)

  • $1,000/academic year ($500/semester) Colonial Cash**

*Campus Dining Dollars are available for use at any of the venues in the Marvin Center, Duques Hall and on the Mount Vernon Campus. These funds roll over between semesters and a portion of the money (up to $700) can be retained for use during the following academic year (Fall 2013 - Spring 2014). Students have until the end of Spring 2014 to use these funds, after which they expire. 

** Colonial Cash is a declining balance, individualized dining program, featuring more than 90 different dining and retail options on campus and throughout the city. Colonial Cash funds are available for use at any Colonial Cash partner. These funds roll over between semesters and from year-to-year and only expire if the account is inactive for a continuous 35-month period.

All food purchases made at any of the campus dining venues with Campus Dining Dollars or Colonial Cash are exempt from D.C.’s 10 percent sales tax. This can represent a significant savings allowing students to get the most value from their dining-plan dollars.

Summer Housing

For more than 30 years, the George Washington University has provided summer accommodations for long-stay student interns and short-stay conference groups. GW’s Summer and Conference Housing Program offers safe, affordable, convenient and enjoyable living in Washington, D.C. In the heart of the Foggy Bottom neighborhood, the GW campus is just minutes away from Dupont Circle, Georgetown and downtown D.C. attractions. Life in GW’s beautiful and historic neighborhood is unparalleled, with a nearby mix of shopping, dancing, dining, entertainment and nightlife. Our residence halls are within walking distance of the Kennedy Center, the U.S. State Department, the White House, the National Mall and other attractions, all of which enhance the GW summer experience.

Carlos Slim Commencement Speech 2012

Good morning. My family and I are very proud of this Honorary Degree and particularly for being with you on your commencement day, our commencement day.

I would like to extend my gratitude to the Board of Trustees and President Knapp of George Washington University for this distinction. 18 years ago in 1994 I wrote a letter to the students who participated in the ceremony of the Academy of American Achievement. I rewrote it for the purpose of reading it to you today, to express some of the thoughts that I have experienced as well as conversations and readings that have come to me during my life.

I hope to contribute to your way of thinking and living, your social commitment, emotional strength, your sense of responsibility, maturity and, above all, your real happiness. Real happiness that is a product of who you are and how you conduct yourselves on a daily basis.

Success is not being recognized by others. It is not about an external opinion. It is about an internal state of being. It is the harmony between the soul and our emotions that are fed by love, family, friendship, authenticity, and honesty. The fundamental and permanent values that are far superior to professional, economic, social or political success.

Fortitude and emotional balance are part of your inner self and are achieved by avoiding negative feelings such as envy, jealousy, arrogance, anger, and greed, feelings that are a poison which is ingested bit by bit. Chronic pessimism leads to mediocrity. When you give, do not expect to receive. "Aroma remains in the hands that gives roses" says a Chinese proverb. Do not allow negative feelings and emotions to dominate your spirit. Emotional damage does not come from third parties. It is forged and given leeway within ourselves. Remember, God forgives our sins but our nervous system doesn't.

Do not mistake values nor belittle principles. Life is a very long road, but it is traveled very fast. Live the present fully and intensely. Let the past not be a burden. May the future be an incentive. Live with a sense of urgency when you are creating, when you are innovating, when you are solving problems, when you are building. Anyone who carves his own future is able to influence reality.

Do not ignore reality. Live with positive feelings such as love, friendship, loyalty, courage, joy, good humor, optimism, self-esteem, peace, serenity, patience, confidence, responsibility, and commitment. As to those contrary feelings that attempt to invade your soul, do not let them inhibit your spirit. Do not allow them to set root. Take them away.

Many times you will make mistakes. It is human and usual. But always try to make small ones. Accept them, correct them, and forget them. Do not obsess over your mistakes. Remember heaven and hell are within us.

What is most worthwhile in life does not have a price: Love, friendship, nature, forms, colors, sounds, and smells that we perceive with our senses, the feelings that are only appreciated when we are awake and open to enjoying life. To be born is a miracle. We should love life always, even during the worst of circumstances. It makes us stronger and develops a positive sense within us and with others.

Live without fears and without guilt. Fear is the worst sentiment of human beings. It weakens us, inhibits actions, and depresses us. Guilt is a tremendous burden that weighs down our thinking, our actions, and our lives. Fear and guilt make the present difficult and obstruct the future. Let us accept ourselves as we are, with our reality, our merits, and our grief.

Occupation displaces preoccupation, and problems when confronted disappear. Problems should make us stronger each time, and from our failures learn. Our successes should be silent stimuli. Always act pursuant to the dictates of your conscience. It is not possible to fool it. Live with your intelligence, your soul, and senses awake and alert to love and enjoy life.

We have the fortune of living a new civilization generous and virtuous of freedom, democracy, diversity, plurality, knowledge, human rights, technology, innovation, creativity, globalization, social mobility, and environmental care, where the development is sustained by the welfare of all. Fighting against poverty and ignorance is not only from ethical, social, and moral reasons but also because of economic needs.

We are committed to developing human capital through health and modern high quality education, connect to grow with broadband in and investing and promoting where the new jobs will be created. New jobs will be created in the information and communications technology, in the development of publications, the micro, small, and medium companies that are all the way all companies begin, health care, education, culture, entertainment, tourism, physical capital, housing services, but we need education, education, and education as much as jobs, jobs, and more jobs. Work well done is not only a responsibility; it is also an emotional necessity.

All crises are opportunities to get stronger and change for the better. With your education, talent and efforts. It is your time to work for the right changes. It is your time to make a better world.

At the end, we leave without anything. But we should leave behind a better world to our children and, most importantly, better children to our world. Congratulations!

Brian Williams Commencement Speech 2012

Thank you very much. I want to thank the D.C. Fire Department for the drive-by just as I was named. And you can thank me later.

I note you're all wearing black; because someone knows I am about to discuss my academic past, the dark cloud has arrived. People are enjoying a lovely day from Cabin John to Arlington to the Eastern Shore except for us because I am about to talk about my time at the George Washington University. And now we have air support. So this is going to get interesting.

I did tell them when they called -- it's really okay, I've got this. I told them when they called, I said, you know, I dropped out of GW. It was my third and final attempt at college. And they said, "Oh, no, that's cool. Come on ahead."

And so today I want to share with you a bit of the story of how I came academically to achieve the sum total of 18 college credits. Thank you very much.

There is an atmosphere of academia up on the stage that you can't understand. So excuse me while I accept the congratulations of my fellow academics.

The best news is I don't have a speech. I have just a few thoughts because it's hot, and you're hung over. But enough about your parents. We're also way too close to Congress to give a speech, and we've established you're all than me. So I have just two things to tell you. Number one, how I dropped out of GW, which is kind of a fun story, and number two, a few great things about America. And then you're free to go.

How I dropped out of GW begins with how I got to Washington, and that starts with a guy named Tony LaVeglia. Tony's name you don't have to remember it, but it's immaterial in that we all have a Tony LaVeglia in our lives. In my case he's the guy who calls you, you're a young firefighter on the Jersey shore, you're in your very first year of Brookdale Community College.

I don't like to brag. It's supposed to just take two years, but you're settling in for a good long haul, you're just getting your rhythm going. You've just passed your EMT exam, and you have applied for a civil service job as a dispatcher in Freehold, New Jersey. Again, I'm going to be bragging throughout my remarks today.

Tony calls, he drives a Ford Econoline van which he has filled with cold liquids, and he says come with me this weekend to Washington, D.C. where I'm going to visit my French girlfriend Claire who is a student at Catholic University. Who was I to say no to Tony LaVeglia? So for just a weekend trip, I leave the confines of my home county in New Jersey, and I come down here, where my eyes are opened.

I think they call it Potomac fever. I get here, and I see young people, all of them wearing khakis. And they're wearing blue blazers, and they are scurrying around, and they all seem to have internships, and they're talking about important things, and they know important people, and all I knew was I had to be a part of it.
Tony, by the way, is today a wine distributor, which shows there is justice in life. I would buy wine from him. He has spent years researching his product line.

I come down and I tried to transfer my vast credits from Brookdale to Catholic University. They have run out of dorm space because I am a little late in applying, so they find room for me in the administration building of Trinity College across the street. There are eight of us living on the top floor, eight men, 600 Catholic women. It was fantastic.

And things just start happening to me. One of the young men we lived with in the administration building named Rocco came home one day and said he had to vacate an internship at the White House, was anyone interested. I owned one blue blazer, again not to brag, but I had worked at Sears, and I bought it with my employee discount.

And I said, "Why, Rocco, that sounds like a terrific opportunity for me." After all, there is nothing about my background that doesn't leave me perfectly equipped to go into the West Wing every day. And so I interviewed for the internship, and by some quirk I got it. And for the next year every day I was going into the West Wing in the Old Executive Office Building, while trying to pursue my college studies at Catholic University.

I was a work-study kid. I've worked since the day I turned 14. Well, the need to make money exceeded my ability to pay for my classes at Catholic University, and so I had to concentrate full time on working there but not studying there, and toward the end of my internship at the White House, I just thought that the night school program at GW fit my schedule better.

I enrolled in a couple of classes, and I remember my last class that would be ever prior to leaving college. It was a night course here at GW on politics and media. Now, I would run from the West Wing with my pass, my West Wing pass casually in my shirt pocket, the chain dangling. Oh, that? Yes. That all-access, this close to the President pass? Why, yes. What about it?

The professor hired -- and this is a long time ago, so it's meant to harm no one. The professor hired to teach this class had come from a PR firm and told us that, that he was working by day at a PR firm and signed up to teach this class. He admitted along the way he had only been on the public tour of the West Wing, and when I was sitting in class, since I was paying the freight, it was like a taxi meter every moment it went by.

I knew it was my money, and it was my future, and then one day he said, "I'll tell you about the news media, they're gullible. At my PR firm, we run something called The Road Information Program or TRIP. We get our funding from road contractors, and every year we put out the list of the roads and bridges in this country that we feel are in most dire need of repair. And every year we kind of sit back and watch the media breathlessly report this list of road and bridges."

It was the first lesson I learned in the news media and how it works. And I'll be darned if all the years I've anchored various news broadcasts we have never repeated the list of road information program, roads and bridges in this country, because I learned my lesson.

Just as your student speaker today has now navigated the political thicket of that dirty Twizzler money in politics. Thank you, both of you. Appreciate it. It was during a particularly tough stretch and one night I was stressed out, I was running out of money, I was living in a basement apartment at 35th and O Streets that flooded on occasion, and the meter was running, and I was running out of cash. And I walked out, walked out of college for the last time.

And I like to say to people that I was in a big hurry and I needed to go make a living, and I never looked back. But the truth is, as the last college I attended, I can tell you, I look back every day, and I look in the mirror, and it's one of my great regrets, and don't forget that by being here today you have now achieved something I was not able to achieve.

And this is where you come in. You enter the world right now -- and I know you've heard this before -- at a time when we're hearing talk about our nation we've never heard before. We're hearing the generation just in front of you tell pollsters for the first time that they don't think they're leaving a better world for you, they don't think your chances will be better than theirs. I have a few reminders, though.

Not far from here, this has to do with our geography here today. Just reminders of how good we are. In the Smithsonian Air and Space, part of this mall, there is an orange aircraft hanging from the ceiling. It was designed to resemble the bullet from a 50-caliber weapon. It's called the X-1. Chuck Yeager flew that aircraft. If you've read the book or seen the movie, then you know. This is back when we were different.

This was 1947. We had been home from World War II for a few years, and we must have been bored. We must have needed excitement. They called it the sound barrier for a reason, because no one knew if Chuck Yeager was going to disintegrate in this thing, and he never gave it a moment's thought or hesitation.

He went up in the X-1, and after that day, the sound barrier was nothing. And it's hanging right over there in that beautiful museum. He just thought we ought to move forward, and there was no guarantee we were going to make it.

Also in that building is a magnificent thing called the X-15. A dozen men flew it, including Neil Armstrong. They had to drop it out of the bottom of a B-52. It flew so high that when the pilots came back down, they had to be designated astronauts because they had flown over 50 miles up, 67 miles high, to be exact. They flew it four and five and six thousand miles an hour. One pilot died trying. His body was ripped apart by a fall of 16Gs, aircraft settled over a 50-mile area. It did not affect the program or his fellow pilots. They all knew there was no guarantee they were going to make it.

Also in that museum is Friendship 7. I described the color of it as kind of charcoal and fire black. It's really a corrugated steel can. John Glenn climbed in that thing. He knew there was no guarantee he was going to make it back. On his way back to reenter Earth's atmosphere, he hummed the Battle Hymn of the Republic to kind of kill the time and occupy his mind, flames are shooting past the window. He thought he was going to roast alive inside. He really did think he was going to die.

And of course all the missions to the moon, there was no guarantee we were going to make it. We lost the first three astronauts on the launching pad in a fire before the first mission.

Again, not to brag, but I drive a Chevy Tahoe. It's big and black and menacing, just as I like it. It a hybrid, just to calm everybody down. I love my car. And about 85 percent of my Chevy Tahoe is because of the space program. The gauges and the sensors and the wiring and the relays and the GPS and the brake linings, NASA was an idea machine. Chuck Yeager, thank you, Neil Armstrong, thank you, John Glenn, thank you, all of you who were involved in the program.

Remember there was no guarantee they were going to make it.

[Applause]

So that's where I hand off to you. Here we are. Our politics are broken. Here we are in the shadow of the U.S. Capitol. How many of you have worked in politics during your time at the George Washington University? All right. Keep that up. My only advice would be get along, please. Introduce yourselves before you leave here today. Remember, there would be no Constitution in this country without compromise. We wouldn't have been formed without compromise. Going without compromise makes you a highly principled person, but it can often lead us to a government that is not attuned to the needs of the people.

How many of you plan to be educators?

[Cheers]

Thank you for that. How many of you spent some time overseas helping impoverished people?

[Cheers]

How many of you plan to keep at that work?

[Cheers]

John F. Kennedy was right when he talked about the army of young people going out around the world. I've walked through countries like Malawi where the difference between a small community with running water coming out of a one-inch white PVC pipe and a town without water is often just which towns have been visited by terrific young American people acting as volunteers.

You should be very proud of something else. It was mostly GW students, as far as I could tell, who climbed those light poles and showed up at the White House the night we learned bin Laden had been killed. It was a good feeling. We had done something. And with that mission, too, there was no guarantee of success.

One more thing. While you've been here, a lot of people have been over there. And a troubling trend in society right now is that our civilian life and our military life are going down -- picture it as a train track – two separate paths, and they don't intersect because of the small percentage of people we call upon to fight our wars because we don't have a draft. You can walk door to door in this country and have to go to 250 homes before you come to the home of a military family. And because we need to bridge that gap and because we might as well start today, can I ask all the veterans with us today to stand up and accept our thanks and congratulations.

[Applause]

That's the greatest part of my job. I've been able to go to both of this nation's wars and see what they do and come back knowing they're the best team we've ever fielded.

And now here's the problem. You know, when our American astronauts, as they did last week, needed a ride up to the international space station, we have to ask the Russians. We don't have a way to get them up there ourselves. It's a last insult to Chuck Yeager. He's still around and with us, and he can see this, and it's an insult to John Glenn. He's still with us living here in the Washington area. He can see this. It breaks their hearts and mine. And remember, Gene Kranz, the great man at Mission Control. His motto was failure is not an option.

You don't actually have to build a rocket or go into space, but please take us somewhere. Please keep us moving. Push us, lift us up. Make us better. Remember this, as I leave you, again as of today, you've achieved what I could not.

Congratulations, God bless, go achieve some more.

[Applause]

Green Living

At GW we embrace “green” building standards, energy efficiency, recycling and sustainable transportation.

Graduate Fellows at GW

Graduate Fellows serve as role models and advisors to juniors and seniors living in university housing.

Graduate Fellows are graduate students in good standing who are enrolled in degree-granting programs at GW. They have demonstrated a strong commitment to academic rigor, intellectual discourse and continual self-assessment. They live in the upper-division residence halls they serve and spend about 20 hours per week carrying out their assigned responsibilities.

The Grad Fellows encourages residents to shape an environment that fosters personal and professional growth. They also help residents prepare for personal and professional life after graduation, including as it relates to lifestyle and career choices.

The Grad Fellows get to know their residents well, provide an example through appropriate behavior at all times and assist their residents in the development of educational, co-curricular initiatives.

Faculty Mentors

The Faculty in Residence (FIR) and Faculty Guide (FG) Programs aim to enhance the life of each student living in the residence halls. They also strengthen the academic mission of the University by facilitating educationally purposeful and rewarding interactions between residents and faculty outside of the classroom.

FGs and FIRs make a considerable time commitment, including nights and weekends. The Faculty-in-Residence staff, in particular, have constant informal interactions with students. The FIRs live in apartments in a GW residence hall.

Faculty-in-Residence

The Faculty-in-Residence (FIR) members, who are provided an apartment in a residence hall, work with residential students. The learning objectives and outcomes for the faculty in residence position are:

  • FIR will develop events and opportunities outside the classroom that extend and deepen intellectual curiosity.
  • Students will learn how to appropriately interact with faculty through informal discussion between FIR and residents.
  • Students will gain a deeper understanding of academic persistence through mentorship from the faculty in residence.

Examples of faculty in residence initiatives:

  • Invited Clarissa Adamson from the U.S. Department of State’s Bureau of Democracy, Human Rights and Labor/International Religious Freedom, to talk with students about working at the U.S. Department
        of State.
  • Hosted a monthly student book club.
  • Held a lecture and reception with artist Charles Cumming.

Faculty Guides

Faculty guides (FG’s) work with students in each of our first-year houses but do not live in the residence halls.

The learning objectives and outcomes for faculty guides are:

  • First-year students will learn how to approach and appropriately talk with professors.
  • Faculty guides will help first-year students acclimate to a rigorous college curriculum through academic mentorship.
  • FG’s will provide opportunities for first-year students to explore academic pursuits and to develop intellectual curiosity outside the classroom.

Recent examples of Faculty Guide events:

  • Alumni Fireside, an event where Abby Gonzalez, a public diplomacy foreign service officer, discussed public relations and the U.S. Foreign Service
  • Thurston Cultural Night of Salsa Dance in which a professional Cuban salsa-dancing troupe performed two songs then gave salsa dance lessons

GW in DC

Special Interest Housing

First-Year: Theme-Based Housing

Politics and Values Community – Somers Hall

In the Politics & Values community, a select group of students will explore societal politics while living and studying together in an intensive year-long course. 

Civic House Community – West Hall

Civic House is a highly-selective first-year program for students interested in becoming active citizens engaged in their communities. The program is anchored by two service-learning courses: in the fall, a university-writing class centered on social change, and in the spring, a class on the local Washington D.C. community’s social and economic needs. While in both courses, students will work in non-profit organizations across the city on a variety of issues including education, poverty, homelessness, and environmental sustainability. In addition to the coursework, the Civic House Scholars will participate in monthly meetings discussing leadership development, civic engagement, and social advocacy. Supplemental event programming will include speakers, DC neighborhood tours, and weekly service projects both in and outside the classroom. 

Elizabeth Somers Women’s Leadership Program – Somers Hall

The Women's Leadership Program (WLP) is a selective, year-long, living and learning program for freshmen women of any school at the George Washington University. Offered exclusively at the Mount Vernon Campus, WLP students have the benefit of small classes, close contact with faculty and women in leadership roles, and strong community ties within the Program. The dynamic curriculum emphasizes exploration and development of women's leadership through academic courses and weekly symposia. WLP symposia offer special lectures, workshops and experiences that draw on the unique resources of Washington, DC, to bring students together with women of achievement and leadership from many professional fields. Students live together in Somers Hall with a graduate teaching assistant who serves as a mentor and academic resource.

University Honors Program – West Hall

Dean's Scholars in Shakespeare Program – Hensley Hall

School of Engineering & Applied Sciences (SEAS) - Thurston Hall

Elliott School of International Affairs (ESIA) - Thurston Hall

GW School of Business (GWSB) - Thurston Hall

While not tied to specific coursework, the first-year SEAS, ESIA, and GWSB communities provide students within each of these schools the opportunity to live with their peers in Thurston Hall.  These academic residential communities work closely with faculty to bring the classroom experience into the residential setting and encourage a supportive environment for students in which to live and study.

Affinity Housing

Affinity Housing presents the opportunity for GW registered student organizations, athletic groups, and academic organizations to create their own living community around their particular needs and interests. Affinity groups must have a minimum of 12 participants.

Gender Neutral Housing

Gender-neutral housing (GNH) allows students of different genders to share the same unit or apartment. All students assigned to a GNH suite, must opt-in and indicate a mutual roommate request in their housing application.  To learn more, visit our FAQs.

Mount Vernon Campus

The Mount Vernon Campus, situated in the quintessential Washington neighborhood of Foxhall, with embassies, museums, and politically connected neighbors all around, is a wonderful option for students. The Mount Vernon Campus is also home to the Provost, and GW’s newest residence hall, featuring wonderful amenities including a fitness center, state of the art recording studios, individual rehearsal space, a black-box theater, an art studio and a dining hall.

Ride a Bike

More than 700 bike racks have been installed around the city since 2000.

4-RIDE ESCORT SERVICE

Is a fleet of escort vehicles that pick up and drop off GW students, faculty and staff anywhere within three blocks of campus.